Etymology
Advertisement
pomegranate (n.)

c. 1300, poumgarnet (a metathesized form), "the large, roundish, many-seeded, red-pulped fruit of the pomegranate tree," from Old French pome grenate (Modern French grenade) and directly from Medieval Latin pomum granatum, literally "apple with many seeds," from pome "apple; fruit" (see Pomona) + grenate "having grains," from Latin granata, fem. of granatus, from granum "grain" (from PIE root *gre-no- "grain").

The classical Latin name was mālum granatum "seeded apple" or mālum Punicum "Punic apple." Italian form is granata, Spanish is granada. The -gra- spelling was restored in English early 15c. Of the tree itself from late 14c.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
grenade (n.)

"small explosive shell," thrown rather than discharged from a cannon, 1590s, earlier "pomegranate" (1520s), from French grenade "pomegranate" (16c.), earlier grenate (12c.), from Old French pomegrenate (see pomegranate). Form influenced by Spanish granada. So called because the many-seeded fruit suggested the powder-filled, fragmenting bomb, or from similarities of shape. See pomegranate. Much used late 17c., they went out of use 18c. but were revived 20c.

Related entries & more 
grenadine (n.)

"syrup made from pomegranates," 1896, from French sirop de grenadin from grenade "pomegranate" (see pomegranate). The type of thin silk fabric, so called from 1851, probably is from Grenada.

Related entries & more 
*gre-no- 
*grə-no-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "grain."

It forms all or part of: corn (n.1); filigree; garner; garnet; grain; granary; grange; granger; granite; granular; granule; grenade; grenadine; kernel; pomegranate.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin granum "seed," Old Church Slavonic zruno "grain," Lithuanian žirnis "pea," Old English corn.
Related entries & more 
garnet (n.)
mid-15c., metathesized form of gernet "the gem garnet" (early 14c.), from Old French grenate, gernatte, granate "garnet," also an adjective, "of a dark red color," from Medieval Latin granatum "garnet; of dark red color," perhaps abstracted from the Medieval Latin or Old French words for pomegranate, from the stone's resemblance either to the shape of the seeds or the color of the pulp. Or the word might be from Medieval Latin granum "grain," in its sense of "cochineal, red dye." A widespread word: Spanish and Portuguese granate, Italian granato, Dutch granaat, German Granat.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
baluster (n.)

also balluster, "support for a railing" (commonly one that swells outward at some point), c. 1600, from French balustre (16c.), from Italian balaustro "small pillar," said to be from balausta "flower of the wild pomegranate," from Greek balaustion (which is perhaps of Semitic origin; compare Aramaic balatz "flower of the wild pomegranate"). The uprights had lyre-like double curves, which resembled the half-opened pomegranate flower.

Related entries & more 
Rhodes 

Greek island, largest of the Dodecanese, from Greek Rhodos, which is perhaps from rhodon "rose," which Beekes allows as a possibility, or rhoia "pomegranate," but "more likely" [Room] from a pre-Greek name, from Phoenician erod "snake," for the serpents which were said to have anciently infested the island. Related: Rhodian.

Related entries & more 
pineapple (n.)

late 14c., pin-appel, "pine cone," from pine (n.) + apple. The reference to the fruit of the tropical plant (from resemblance of shape) is recorded by 1660s, and pine-cone emerged 1690s to replace pineapple in its original sense except in dialect. For "pine-cone," Old English also used pinhnyte "pine nut." Pine-apple also was used in a late 14c. Biblical translation for "pomegranate."

Related entries & more 
Granada 
Moorish kingdom, after 1492 a Spanish province, named for its city, which was founded in 8c. by the Arabs on the site of Roman Illiberis. The name is said to be from Latin granatum "pomegranate," either from fruit grown in the region or from some fancied resemblance. Others connect the name to Moorish karnattah, said to mean "hill of strangers." The Roman name is said to be Iberian and represent cognates of Basque hiri "town" + berri "new," and it survives in the name of the surrounding Sierra Elvira. Related: Granadine.
Related entries & more