Etymology
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long-playing (adj.)
1910, of gramophone recordings, from long (adv.) + present participle of play (v.).
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card-table (n.)
"table for playing card games," 1713, from card (n.1) + table (n.).
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clowning (n.)

"playing the clown," 1848, verbal noun from clown (v.).

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reshuffle (v.)

1816, in reference to packs of playing cards, "to shuffle again;" by 1890, in reference to organizations, "redistribute" posts or positions; from re- "back, again" + shuffle (v.). Related: Reshuffled; reshuffling. As a noun from 1861 in card-playing.

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bid (n.)
1788, "an offer of a price," from bid (v.). From 1880 in card-playing.
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cartomancy (n.)
"divination by means of playing-cards," 1852, from combining form of card (n.1) + -mancy.
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field-goal (n.)
1889 in football, from field (n.) + goal (n.). A score made from the playing field.
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outplay (v.)

also out-play, "to play better than, surpass in playing," 1640s, from out- + play (v.). Related: Outplayed; outplaying.

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alley (n.2)
also ally, type of large playing marble (generally one of stone as opposed to terra cotta), 1720, said to be a shortening of alabaster.
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rpg (n.)

by 1979, initialism (acronym) from role-playing game (see roleplay). As an initialism for rocket-propelled grenade, by 1970.

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