Etymology
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plan (v.)

1728, "make a plan of; put on paper the parts, dimensions, and methods of construction of," from plan (n.). By 1737 as "to scheme, to devise ways and means for (the doing of something)." Related: Planned; planning; plans. Planned economy is attested by 1931. Planned Parenthood (1942) formerly was Birth Control Federation of America.

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phase-out (n.)

"gradual, planned removal or elimination," 1958, from the verbal phrase (1954; see phase (v.)).

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projected (adj.)

"planned, put forth as a project," 1706, past-participle adjective from project (v.). In Middle English and early Modern English the adjective was simply project.

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sell (n.)

1838, "a hoax or planned deception by which a victim is 'taken in,' " from sell (v.). The sense of "advertising technique" is attested by 1952 in the phrase hard sell.

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infralapsarian (adj.)

1731, from infra- + Latin lapsus "a fall" (see lapse (n.)) + ending from unitarian, etc.

[In theology], the doctrine held by Augustinians and by many Calvinists, that God planned the creation, permitted the fall, elected a chosen number, planned their redemption, and suffered the remainder to be eternally punished. The Sublapsarians believe that God did not permit but foresaw the fall, while the Supralapsarians hold that God not only permitted but decreed it. [Century Dictionary]
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prepense (adj.)

"planned beforehand, premeditated," 1702, short for prepensed, prepenst (mid-15c.), past-participle adjective from obsolete verb prepense "consider beforehand," originally purpense, from Old French pourpenser "to plan, meditate" (11c.), from pro "before" (see pro-) + penser "to think," from Latin pensare "weigh, consider," frequentative of pendere "to hang, cause to hang; weigh; pay" (from PIE root *(s)pen- "to draw, stretch, spin").

Usually in the legal phrase malice prepense (with French word order) "wrong or injury purposefully done or planned in advance" (see malice). This is attested from mid-15c. as malice prepensed. Related: Prepensive.

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judicious (adj.)

c. 1600, "having sound judgment; careful, prudent," also "manifesting sound judgment, carefully planned," from French judicieux (16c.) or directly from Medieval Latin iudiciosus "prudent, judicious," from Latin iudicium "judgment," from iudicem "a judge" (see judge (n.)). Related: Judiciously; judiciousness.

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obsolescence (n.)

"state or process of gradually falling into disuse, a becoming obsolete," 1809; see obsolescent + -ence. Phrase planned obsolescence was coined 1932, revived as a disparaging term 1950s.

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contrivance (n.)

1620s, "a plan or scheme for attaining some end," from contrive + -ance. Meaning "act of contriving" is from 1640s; sense of "the thing contrived, planned, or invented" is from 1660s. Earlier was contrival (c. 1600).

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Levittown 
used figuratively for "generic suburban tract housing," American English, from the vast planned real estate developments built by the firm Levitt & Sons Inc., the first on Long Island, 1946-51 (more than 17,000 homes), the second north of Philadelphia (1951-55).
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