Etymology
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high-pitched (adj.)
1590s of character, "aspiring, haughty;" 1748 of sound, from high (adv.) + pitch (v.1).
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clarion (n.)

"small, high-pitched trumpet," early 14c., from Old French clarion "(high-pitched) trumpet, bugle" and directly from Medieval Latin clarionem (nominative clario) "a trumpet," from Latin clarus "clear" (see clear (adj.)). Clarion call in the figurative sense "call to battle" is attested from 1838 (clarion's call is from 1807).

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zing (n.)
1911, "high pitched sound," of echoic origin. Slang meaning "energy, zest" is attested from 1918. Verb is from 1920; meaning "to deliver a stinging witticism or retort" is by 1975.
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shrill (adj.)
late 14c., schrylle "high-pitched, piercing" (of the voice), probably related to Old English scralletan "to sound loudly" and of imitative origin (compare Low German schrell, German schrill "piercing, shrill"). Related: Shrillness; shrilly (adv.).
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tuba (n.)
1852 in reference to a modern, large, low-pitched brass musical instrument, from French tuba, from Latin tuba (plural tubae) "straight bronze war trumpet" (as opposed to the crooked bucina), related to tubus (see tube (n.)).
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bombard (n.)

early 15c., "catapult, military engine for throwing large stones" ("The name generally given in Europe to the cannon during the 1st century of its use" - Century Dictionary), from Old French bombarde "mortar, catapult" (14c.), from bombe (see bomb (n.)). The same word, from the same source, was used in English and French late 14c. in reference to the bass shawm, a low-pitched bassoon-like musical instrument, preserving the "buzzing" sense in the Latin.

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hautboy (n.)

"oboe, double-reeded woodwind instrument," 1570s, from French hautbois "high wood" (15c.; see oboe, which is the Italian phonetic spelling of the French word). The haut is used here in its secondary sense of "high-pitched." In early use frequently nativized as hoboy, hawboy, etc.

This Pageaunt waz clozd vp with a delectable harmony of Hautboiz, Shalmz, Coronets, and such oother looud muzik. [Robert Laneham, 1575]
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ping (n.)

1835, imitative of the sound of a bullet whistling through the air or striking something sharply. Meaning "short, high-pitched electronic pulse" is attested from 1943. As a verb from 1855; in computer sense is from at least 1981, based on earlier use of the word in reference to a submarine sonar pulse, in which it might combine the sound-word and ping-pong (which also is based on sound). Related: Pinged; pinging.

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discus (n.)

circular piece of stone or metal plate about 12 inches in diameter, pitched from a fixed spot the greatest possible distance as a gymnastic exercise and an athletic contest, 1650s, from Latin discus "discus, disk," from Greek diskos "disk, quoit, platter," related to dikein "to throw," which is perhaps from PIE *dik-skos-, from root *deik- "to show, pronounce solemnly; also in derivatives referring to the directing of words or objects" [Watkins]; but Beekes says dikein is of Pre-Greek origin. The notion is "to throw" as "to direct an object."

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oboe (n.)

"wooden, double-reeded wind instrument, 1724, from Italian oboe, from phonological spelling of French hautbois (itself borrowed in English 16c. as hautboy), from haut "high, loud, high-pitched" (see haught) + bois "wood" (see bush (n.)). So called because it had the highest register among woodwind instruments. Also compare shawm. Related: Oboist (by 1830). "The tone is small, but highly individual and penetrating; it is especially useful for pastoral effects, for plaintive and wailing phrases, and for giving a reedy quality to concerted passages." [Century Dictionary]

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