Etymology
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De Profundis 

"the 130th Psalm" (one of the seven penitential psalms), so called for its opening words in Latin, literally "out of the depths (have I cried)." From ablative plural of profundum (see profound).

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Rio de Janeiro 
literally "January River," named by explorer Amerigo Vespucci because he discovered it on Jan. 1, 1502, and so called because he incorrectly thought the bay was the estuary of a large river. See January.
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Los Angeles 
city in southern California, U.S., founded 1781; the modern name is short for the original, given variously as El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora de los Ángeles or El Pueblo de la Reyna de los Ángeles.
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Dolores 

fem. proper name, from Spanish Maria de los Dolores, literally "Mary of the Sorrows," from plural of dolor, from Latin dolor "pain, sorrow," perhaps from PIE root *delh- "to chop" "under the assumption than 'pain' was expressed by the feeling of 'being torn apart'" [de Vaan]. 

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Curacao 

West Indian island, Curaçao, discovered 1499 by Alonso de Hojeda, who called it Isla de los Gigantes in reference to the stature of the natives. The modern name probably is a Europeanized version of a lost native word. The liqueur (1813) is made from the dried peel of the Curaçao orange.

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Lycra 
elastic polyurethane fiber, 1955, proprietary name (registered by E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Company, Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.) of an elastic polyurethane fiber.
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Delaware 

U.S. state, river, and native tribe, all named for the bay, which was named for Baron (commonly "Lord") De la Warr (Thomas West, 1577-1618), first English colonial governor of Virginia. The family name is attested from 1201, from Delaware in Brasted, Kent, which is probably ultimately from de la werre "of the war" (a warrior), from Old French werre/guerre "war" (see war (n.)).  Related: Delawarean.

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Hudibras 
title of Samuel Butler's 1663 mock-heroic satire against the Puritans; the name is said to be from Hugh de Bras, knight of the Round Table. Related: Hudibrastic (1712).
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Calcutta 
city in eastern India, former capital of British India, named for Hindu goddess Kali. In modern use often de-Englished as Kolkata.
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Nostradamus 

"a prophet, seer, a fortune-teller," 1660s, from Latinized name of Michel de Nostredame (1503-1566), French physician and astrologer, who published his collection of predictions, titled "Centuries," in 1555.

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