Etymology
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vision (n.)
c. 1300, "something seen in the imagination or in the supernatural," from Anglo-French visioun, Old French vision "presence, sight; view, look, appearance; dream, supernatural sight" (12c.), from Latin visionem (nominative visio) "act of seeing, sight, thing seen," noun of action from past participle stem of videre "to see," from PIE root *weid- "to see." The meaning "sense of sight" is first recorded late 15c. Meaning "statesman-like foresight, political sagacity" is attested from 1926.
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invision (n.)
"want of vision," 1640s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + vision (n.).
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envision (v.)
1914, from en- (1) "make, put in" + vision (n.). Related: Envisioned; envisioning. Earlier (1827) is envision'd in sense "endowed with vision."
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visionary (adj.)
"able to see visions," 1650s (earlier "perceived in a vision," 1640s), from vision + -ary. Meaning "impractical" is attested from 1727. The noun is attested from 1702, from the adjective; originally "one who indulges in impractical fantasies."
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vid. 
abbreviation of vide, Latin imperative singular of videre "to see" (see vision).
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Vistavision (n.)
form of wide-screen cinematography, 1954; see vista + vision.
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optometrist (n.)

"one whose profession is to measure the range and power of vision," 1903; see optometry + -ist.

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vue 
French, literally "view, sight; aspect, appearance; vision" (see view (n.)).
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televangelist (n.)
1973, from tele(vision) + evangelist. Earliest usages are in reference to Rex Humbard (television evangelist is from 1958).
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blinkered (adj.)

in the figurative sense, 1849, from horses wearing blinkers to limit the range of their vision (see blinker).

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