Etymology
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pedantic (adj.)

"making an undue or inappropriate display of learning, absurdly learned," formed in English c. 1600, from pedant + -ic. The French equivalent is pédantesque. Perhaps first attested in John Donne's "Sunne Rising," where he bids the morning sun let him and his love linger in bed, telling it, "Sawcy pedantique wretch, goe chide Late schooleboyes." Related: Pedantical (1580s); pedantically.

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pedanticism (n.)

"a pedantic notion or expression," by 1836, from pedantic + -ism. Earlier was pedantism (1590s) "the character or style of a pedant."

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hebdomadally (adv.)
"weekly," 1798, pedantic humor, from hebdomadal + -ly (2).
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donnish (adj.)

"pertaining to or characteristic of an English don" (pedantic, scholarly), 1823, from don (n.) in the university sense + -ish. Related: Donnishness.

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calcitrant (adj.)
"kicking (at restrictions), refractory," 1857, as if from Latin calcitrantem (nominative calcitrans) "kicking" (see recalcitrant). Pedantic humor; probably a back-formation.
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hebdomadal (adj.)
1610s, from Late Latin hebdomadalis, from Latin hebdomas "seven, the seventh day; a week" (see hebdomad). In later use as pedantic humor.
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precieuse (n.)

"pedantic woman, woman aiming at refined delicacy of language and taste," a French word attested in English from 1727, from French précieuse, noun use of fem. of précieux (see precious (adj.)); especially as lampooned in Molière's comedy "Les Précieuses ridicules" (1659).

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ideation (n.)

"process or act of forming ideas," 1829; see idea + -ation. Related: Ideational.

As we say Sensation, we might say also, Ideation; it would be a very useful word; and there is no objection to it, except the pedantic habit of decrying a new term. [James Mill, "Analysis of the Phenomena of the Human Mind," London, 1829]

Related: Ideational.

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strenuous (adj.)

"characterized by great effort," mid-15c. (implied in strenuously), from Latin strenuus "active, brisk, quick, nimble, prompt, vigorous, keen." Probably cognate with Greek strēnes, strēnos "keen, strong," strenos "arrogance, eager desire," Old English stierne "hard, severe, keen" (see stern (adj.)). Mocked by Ben Jonson as a pedantic neologism in "Poetaster" (1601). Sense of "requiring much energy" is first recorded 1670s. Related: Strenuousness; strenuosity.

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optic (adj.)

late 14c., optik, "of or pertaining to the eye as the organ of vision," from Old French optique, obtique (c. 1300) and directly from Medieval Latin opticus "of sight or seeing," from Greek optikos "of or having to do with sight," from optos "seen, visible," related to ōps "eye," from PIE root *okw- "to see." Meaning "relating to or pertaining to vision or sight" is from 1590s. Optics "eyes" is from 1640s; "formerly the learned and elegant term; afterwards pedantic, and now usually humorous" [OED].

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