Etymology
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paste (v.1)

1560s, "to stick with paste or cement;" see paste (n.). Meaning "apply paste to, cover by pasting over" is from c. 1600. Middle English had pasten "to make a paste of; bake in a pastry." Related: Pasted; pasting.

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paste (n.)

c. 1300 (mid-12c. as a surname), "dough for the making of bread or pastry," from Old French paste "dough, pastry" (13c., Modern French pâte), from Late Latin pasta "dough, pastry cake, paste" (see pasta). Meaning "glue mixture, dough used as a plaster seal" is attested from c. 1400; broader sense of "a composition just moist enough to be soft without liquefying" is by c. 1600. In reference to a kind of heavy glass made of ground quartz, etc., often used to imitate gems, by 1660s.

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paste (v.2)

"hit hard," by 1846, probably an alteration of baste "beat" (see lambaste) influenced by some sense of paste (n.1). Related: Pasted; pasting.

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paste-up (n.)

1930, in printing, "a plan of a page with the position of text, illustrations, etc. indicated," from verbal phrase; see paste (v.) + up (adv.).

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cut-and-paste (adj.)

"made or composed by piecing together existing parts," by 1938 with reference to trick photographs; see cut (v.) + paste (v.). By 1959 with reference to doing things with haste, carelessness, or lack of inspiration.

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pasties (n.)
"adhesive patches worn over the nipples by exotic dancers," 1957, plural diminutive from paste (v.).
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pasty (adj.)

"resembling paste" in consistence or color, 1650s, from paste (n.) + -y (2). Related: Pastiness.

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pasteboard (n.)

kind of thick paper, 1540s, from paste (n.) + board (n.1). So called because it originally was made of several single sheets of paper pasted together.

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pastry (n.)

mid-15c., "food made with or from paste or having it as a principal ingredient," not originally limited to sweets, from Middle English paste (see paste (n.)) + -ry. Probably influenced by Old French pastoierie "pastry" (Modern French pâtisserie), from pastoier "pastry cook," from paste (see paste (n.)); also borrowed from Medieval Latin pasteria "pastry," from Latin pasta. Specific sense of "small confection made of pastry" is by 1906. Pastry-cook is attested from 1650s.

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toothpaste (n.)
also tooth-paste, 1832, from tooth + paste (n.). Earlier substances were tooth-powder (1540s); tooth-soap (c. 1600).
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