Etymology
Advertisement
parliamentary (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a parliament; in accordance with the rules and usages of legislatures," 1610s, from parliament + -ary.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
parliament (n.)

c. 1300, parlement, "consultation; formal conference, assembly," from Old French parlement (11c.), originally "a speaking, talk," from parler "to speak" (see parley (n.)); the spelling was altered c. 1400 to conform with Medieval Latin parliamentum.

Anglo-Latin parliamentum is attested from early 13c. The specific sense of "representative assembly of England or Ireland" (with capital P-) emerged by mid-14c. from the broader meaning "a conference of the secular and/or ecclesiastical aristocracy summoned by a monarch."

Related entries & more 
*gwele- 

*gwelə-, also *gwel-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to throw, reach," with extended sense "to pierce."

It forms all or part of: anabolic; arbalest; astrobleme; ball (n.2) "dancing party;" ballad; ballet; ballista; ballistic; ballistics; belemnite; catabolism; devil; diabolical; discobolus; emblem; embolism; hyperbola; hyperbole; kill (v.); metabolism; palaver; parable; parabola; parley; parliament; parlor; parol; parole; problem; quell; quail (v.) "lose heart, shrink, cower;" symbol.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit apa-gurya "swinging," balbaliti "whirls, twirls;" Greek ballein "to throw, to throw so as to hit," also in a looser sense, "to put, place, lay," bole "a throw, beam, ray," belemnon "dart, javelin," belone "needle," ballizein "to dance;" Armenian kelem "I torture;" Old Church Slavonic zali "pain;" Lithuanian galas "end," gėla "agony," gelti "to sting."

Related entries & more 
commons (n.)

mid-14c., "the people collectively," especially "the common people as distinguished from the rulers and nobility and the clergy; the freemen of England as represented in Parliament" (late 14c.), from common (n.). Meaning "the lower house of Parliament, consisting of commoners chosen by the people as their representatives" is from early 15c. House of Commons is from 1620s. Meaning "provisions for a community or company" is from mid-14c.

Related entries & more 
Cortes (n.)

1660s, "national legislative assembly of Spain; parliament or legislature of Portugal," from Spanish and Portuguese plural of corte, from Latin cortem (see court (n.)).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
M.P. 

1917, abbreviation of military police, which is recorded from 1827. By 1809 as an abbreviation of Member of Parliament.

Related entries & more 
Knesset 
Israeli parliament, 1949, from Mishnaic Hebrew keneseth "gathering, assembly," from stem of Hebrew kanas "he gathered, assembled, collected."
Related entries & more 
consolidated (adj.)

"made firm, solid, hard, or compact," 1736, past-participle adjective from consolidate. Of bills in parliament, 1741; of money, debt, etc., 1753.

Related entries & more 
recruiter (n.)

"one who recruits" in any sense, 1760s, agent noun from recruit (v.). Earlier "an additional member of parliament" (1690s).

Related entries & more 
tabagie (n.)
1819, from French tabagie (17c.), from tabac "tobacco" (see tobacco) + -age. A group of smokers who meet in club fashion; a "tobacco-parliament." In German, a Rauchkneipe.
Related entries & more