Etymology
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lutetium (n.)
rare metallic element, 1907, from French lutécium, from Latin Lutetia, representing "Paris" (see Paris) + metallic element ending -ium.
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Parisian 

early 15c., Parisien (n.), "native or inhabitant of Paris;" 1610s (adj.), "of or pertaining to Paris;" from French parisien, from Medieval Latin parisianus (see Paris). Fem. form Parisienne (n.) is attested in English from 1886.

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FIFA 
1915, acronym from Fédération Internationale de Football Association, founded 1904 in Paris.
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invalid (n.)
"infirm or sickly person," 1709, originally of disabled military men, from invalid (adj.1). In Paris, Invalides is short for Hôtel des Invalides, home for old and disabled soldiers in the 7th arrondissement of Paris.
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Interpol 
1952, contraction of international police (in full, The International Criminal Police Commission), founded 1923 with headquarters in Paris.
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zebu (n.)
Asiatic ox, 1774, from French zebu, ultimately of Tibetan origin. First shown in Europe at the Paris fair of 1752.
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Versailles 
place outside Paris, of uncertain origin; perhaps from Latin versus "slope." Louis XIII built a hunting lodge there; made into a palace 17c. by Louis XIV.
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tontine (n.)
1765, from French tontine, named for Lorenzo Tonti, Neapolitan banker in Paris who in 1653 first proposed this method of raising money in France.
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communalism (n.)

"theory or principles of government by independent communes," 1871 (in reference to Paris), from French communalisme; see communal + -ism. Perhaps coined to keep the idea distinct from communisme.

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Chanel 
Paris fashion house, founded by Gabrielle 'Coco' Chanel (1883-1971), French fashion designer and perfumier, who opened her first shop in 1909. The perfume Chanel No. 5 debuted in 1921.
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