Etymology
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palladium (n.1)

"a safeguard," c. 1600, originally (late 14c., Palladioun) "a sacred image of Pallas Athene," from Old French palladion, from Latin palladium, from Greek Palladion, noun use of neuter of Palladios "of Pallas." It stood in the citadel of Troy and the safety of the city was believed to depend on it. Related: Palladian.

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palladium (n.2)

metallic element, coined 1803 by discoverer William Hyde Wollaston (1766-1828), from Pallas, the name given to an asteroid discovered the previous year (by German astronomer Olbers) and named for the goddess (see Pallas).

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Beatlemania (n.)

1963; see Beatles + mania.

In September [1963], the Beatles played the Royal Albert Hall in London, and in October they had top bill on "Val Parnell's Sunday Night at the Palladium" show. Fans lined up all day on Argyll Street outside the Palladium for a glimpse of the boys, a phenomenon that was unprecedented at that time. Hundreds of extra policemen were called in to deal with the crowd, and some later estimated that as many as 2,000 girls mobbed the band as they tried to enter the theater. ... All major British newspapers headlined the story the next day, and the term "Beatlemania" was coined to describe the frenzy and hysteria that fans exhibited over the Beatles. [Jacqueline Edmondson, "John Lennon: A Biography," 2010]
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