Etymology
Advertisement
palatable (adj.)

1660s, "good-tasting, agreeable to the taste," from palate + -able. Figurative sense of "agreeable to the mind or feelings" is from 1680s. Related: Palatably; palatability.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
unpalatable (adj.)
1680s, from un- (1) "not" + palatable (adj.). Related: Unpalatably.
Related entries & more 
sugar-coat (v.)
also sugarcoat, 1870, originally of medicine; figuratively, "make more palatable," from 1910; from sugar (n.) + coat (v.). Related: Sugarcoated; sugarcoating.
Related entries & more 
tasty (adj.)
1610s, "having agreeable flavor, palatable," from taste (n.) + -y (2); in late 18c. it also could mean "tasteful, elegant" (from the secondary sense of taste (n.)). Related: Tastiness.
Related entries & more 
unseasoned (adj.)
1580s, "not made palatable by seasoning," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of season (v.). Meaning "not habituated by experience" is recorded from c. 1600.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
zucchini (n.)
1915 in English cookery books, 1910 in travel books about Italy as an Italian word (defined as "an odd kind of little squash, very tender and palatable"), from Italian, plural of zucchino, diminutive of zucca "gourd, squash," perhaps from Late Latin cucutia, which is of unknown origin.
Related entries & more 
season (v.)
"improve the flavor of by adding spices," c. 1300, from Old French assaisoner "to ripen, season," from a- "to" (see ad-) + root of season (n.) on the notion of fruit becoming more palatable as it ripens. Applied to timber by 1540s. In 16c., it also meant "to copulate with."
Related entries & more 
disgust (v.)
Origin and meaning of disgust

c. 1600, "have a strong distaste for or repugnance to," from French desgouster "have a distaste for" (16c.), from desgoust "distaste," also "strong dislike" (see disgust (n.)).

The sense has strengthened over time in English, and subject and object have been reversed; the older use looks like this: "It is not very palatable, which makes some disgust it" (1660s). The reverse sense of "to excite nausea and loathing in" is attested from 1640s. Related: Disgusted; disgusting.

Related entries & more 
anemone (n.)

flowering plant genus, 1550s, from French anemone (16c., corrected from Old French anemoine) and directly from Latin anemone, from Greek anemone "wind flower," literally "daughter of the wind," from anemos "wind" (cognate with Latin anima, from PIE root *ane- "to breathe") + -one feminine patronymic suffix.

According to Asa Gray it was so called because it was thought to open only when the wind blows. Klein suggests the flower name perhaps originally is from Hebrew (compare na'aman, in nit'e na'amanim, literally "plants of pleasantness," in Isaiah xvii.10, from na'em "was pleasant"). In zoology, applied to a type of sea creature from 1773 (probably short for sea anemone, which is by 1742). Related: Anemonic. Greek akalēphē "sea-anemone," also "stinging nettle," is of uncertain origin.

Sea anemones are eaten, fried in oil, throughout the Mediterranean and in northern France, under such names as cul de cheval, cul d'âne, pisseuse, etc. ... The Abbé Dicquemare (Phil. Trans. lxv, p. 219, 1775) considers the large A. crassicornis the best of its kind; it should be boiled in sea-water, when it becomes firm and palatable and tastes like warm crab. It fetched a high price in Bordeaux in Rondelet's time. [D'Arcy Thompson, "A Glossary of Greek Fishes"]
Related entries & more