Etymology
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panem et circenses 

Latin, literally "bread and circuses," supposedly coined by Juvenal and describing the cynical formula of the Roman emperors for keeping the masses content with ample food and entertainment.

Duas tantum res anxius optat, Panem et circenses [Juvenal, Sat. x.80].
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Pap test (n.)
1963, short for Papanicolaou (1947) in reference to George Nicholas Papanicolaou (1883-1962), Greek-born U.S. anatomist who developed the technique of examining secreted cells to test for cancer.
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par excellence 

French, from Latin per excellentiam "by the way of excellence." French par "by, through, by way of, by means of" is from Latin per (see per). For second element, see excellence.

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pari passu 

"on an equality, without preference," Latin, literally "with equal step," from ablative of par "equal" (see par) + passus "pace" (see pace (n.)).

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part of speech (n.)

"a word viewed as a constituent member of a sentence," c. 1500, translating Latin pars orationis (see parse). The parts of speech are: Noun, adjective, pronoun, verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection. Sometimes article and participle are counted among them.

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pas devant les enfants 
French: "Not in front of the children."
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pass out (v.)

"lose consciousness," 1915, from pass (v.) + out. Probably a weakened sense from earlier meaning "to die" (1899). Meaning "to distribute" is attested from 1926. Related: Passed out.

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Pathet Lao 
communist guerrilla movement and political party in Laos, 1954, from Laotian Thai, literally "Land of the Lao" (see Laos).
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Patriot Act 

signed into law Oct. 26, 2001; a contrived acronym for the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001.

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pea jacket (n.)

"heavy coat generally worn by sailors in cold or stormy weather," 1721, a partial loan-translation of North Frisian pijekkat, from Dutch pijjekker, from pij "coarse woolen cloth" + jekker "jacket." Middle English had pee "coat of coarse, thick wool" (late 15c.). Related: Pea-coat.

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