Etymology
Advertisement
patrol (v.)

"to go the rounds in a camp or garrison, march about as a guard," 1690s, from patrol (n.) and in part from French patrouiller. Related: Patrolled; patrolling.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
patrolman (n.)
"police constable on a particular beat," 1841, from patrol (n.) + man (n.).
Related entries & more 
patron (n.)

c. 1300, patroun, "a lord-master, one who protects, supports, or encourages," also "one who has the right of presenting a clergyman to a preferment," from Old French patron "patron, protector, patron saint" (12c.) and directly from Medieval Latin patronus "patron saint, bestower of a benefice; lord, master; model, pattern, example," from Latin patronus "defender, protector; former master (of a freed slave); advocate," from pater (genitive patris) "father" (see father (n.)). A doublet of pattern (n.); also compare patroon.

From late 14c. as "founder of a religious order," also "a patron saint." The meaning "one who advances and encourages the cause or work" of an artist, institution, etc., usually by means of the person's wealth and power, is suggested from late 14c., clearly in this sense by c. 1600; "commonly a wretch who supports with insolence, and is paid with flattery" [Johnson]. The commercial sense of "regular customer" is recorded from c. 1600. Patron saint "saint regarded as a special protector of a person, place, profession, etc." (by 1717) originally was simply patron (late 14c.).

Related entries & more 
patronage (n.)

late 14c., "right of presenting a qualified person to a church benefice," from Old French patronage (14c.) from patron "patron, protector" (see patron) and directly from Medieval Latin patronagium. Secular sense of "action of giving influential support; aid offered by a patron or patrons" is from 1550s. General sense of "power to give jobs or favors, control of appointments to positions in public service," is from 1769; meaning "regular business of customers" is by 1804.

Related entries & more 
patroness (n.)

early 15c., patronesse, "female patron saint," from Medieval Latin patronissa, fem. of patronus "protector, defender" (see patron). Meaning "a female patron" is from c. 1500.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
patronise (v.)
chiefly British English spelling of patronize (q.v.); for suffix, see -ize. Related: Patronised; patronising.
Related entries & more 
patronize (v.)

1580s, "to act as a patron towards, favor, assist," from patron + -ize, or from Old French patroniser. Meaning "treat in a condescending way" is attested by 1797; the sense of "give regular business to" is from 1801. Related: Patronized; patronizing; patronization.

Related entries & more 
patronizing (adj.)

"ostentatiously superior and condescendingly favorable," by 1806, present-participle adjective from patronize. In 18c. generally in a more positive sense, "act as a patron to, support and encourage." Related: Patronizingly.

Related entries & more 
patronym (n.)

"a patronymic name," 1834, from Greek patrōnymos "named from the father" (see patronymic).

Related entries & more 
patronymic (n.)

"a name derived from that of parents or ancestors," 1610s, from Late Latin patronymicum, from neuter of patronymicus (adj.) "derived from a father's name," from Greek patrōnymos "named from the father," from patēr (genitive patros) "father" (see father (n.)) + onyma "name," Aeolic dialectal variant of onoma "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name"). As an adjective, "derived from the name of a father or ancestor," from 1660s. Related: Patronymically.

Related entries & more 

Page 71