Etymology
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parodize (v.)

"to write a parody upon; to imitate ridiculously, as a parody," 1650s; see parody (n.) + -ize. Related: Parodized; parodizing.

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parody (n.)
Origin and meaning of parody

1590s (first recorded use in English is in Ben Jonson), "literary work in which the form and expression of dignified writing are closely imitated but are made ridiculous by the ludicrously inappropriate subject or methods; a travesty that follows closely the form and expression of the original," from or in imitation of Latin parodia "parody," from Greek parōidia "burlesque song or poem," from para- "beside, parallel to" (see para- (1), in this case, "mock-") + ōidē "song, ode" (see ode). The meaning "a poor or feeble imitation" is from 1830. Related: Parodic; parodical.

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parody (v.)

1745, "to turn into a parody, write a parody upon," from parody (n.). The general sense of "to imitate as a parody" is by 1801. Related: Parodied; parodying.

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parol (n.)

"oral statement, something said or spoken," late 15c., from Anglo-French (14c.), from Old French parole "word, speech, argument" (see parole (n.)). As an adjective, "verbal, oral," from c. 1600.

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parole (v.)

1716, from parole (n.). Originally it was what the prisoner did ("pledge"), but this sense is obsolete; its transitive meaning "put on parole, allow to go at liberty on parole" is attested by 1782. Meaning "release (a prisoner) on his own recognizance" is by 1888. Related: Paroled; paroling.

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parole (n.)

1610s, "word of honor," especially "promise by a prisoner of war not to escape if allowed to go about at liberty, or not to take up arms again if allowed to return home," from French parole "word, speech" (in parole d'honneur "word of honor") from Vulgar Latin *paraula "speech, discourse," from Latin parabola "comparison," from Greek parabole "a comparison, parable," literally "a throwing beside," hence "a juxtaposition" (see parable). Sense of "conditional release of a prisoner before full term" is attested by 1908 in criminal slang.

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parolee (n.)

"one who has been released on parole," 1908, from parole (v.) + -ee.

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paronomasia (n.)

in rhetoric, "the use of words similar in sound but different in sense; use of the same word in different senses;" more or less, but not quite, "punning;" 1570s, from Latin, from Greek paronomasia "play upon words which sound similarly," from paronomazein "to alter slightly, to call with slight change of name," literally "to name beside," from par- (see para- (1)) + onomasia "naming," from onoma "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name"). Related: Paranomastic; paranomastical.

Pun and paronomasia are often confounded, but are in strictness distinct in form and effect. A pun is a play upon two senses of the same word or sound, and its effect is to excite a sense of the ludicrous .... Paronomasia is rather the use of words that are nearly but not quite alike in sound, and it heightens the effect of what is said without suggesting the ludicrous: as, "Per angusta ad augusta" ; "And catch with his surcease success," Shak., Macbeth, i. 7. 4. ...  As in these examples, it is most likely to be used where the words thus near in sound are far apart in meaning. [Century Dictionary]
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paronychia (n.)

"inflammation beside a fingernail," 1590s, from Latin, from Greek paronykhia "whitlow," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + onyx "nail" (see nail (n.)) + abstract noun ending -ia.

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paronym (n.)

"cognate word, a word which is derivative from another or from the same third word," 1846, from Greek paronymos, "formed by a slight change," from para- (see para- (1)) + onyma "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name"). Paronymous "having the same derivation, allied in origin" is from 1660s; in the sense of "having similar sound but differing in spelling and sense" is is by 1836. Related: Paronymic; paronymy.

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