Etymology
Advertisement
Paraguay 

South American country, named for the river, which is said to be from Guarani para "water" + guay "born." This is said to have been the name of a local chieftain who treated with the first Spanish explorers. Related: Paraguayan (1690s).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
parakeet (n.)

"a small parrot," 1620s, from Spanish perquito; earlier English form parroket (1580s) is from French paroquet, from Old French paroquet (14c.), which is said by etymologists of French to be from Italian parrocchetto, literally "little priest," from parroco "parish priest," from Church Latin parochus (see parish), or from parrucchetto, diminutive of parrucca "peruke, periwig," in reference to the head plumage.

The Spanish form, meanwhile, is sometimes said to be a diminutive of Perico, a familiar form of Pedro "Peter," and the Old French word is likewise perhaps from or influenced by a diminutive of Pierre "Peter." "The relationship between the Sp. and It. forms cannot be settled until the chronology is known; prob. the name has been modified by popular etymology in one or both" [OED].

Related entries & more 
paralanguage (n.)

"non-phonemic vocal factors in speech" (tone of voice, tempo, etc.), 1958, from para- (1) + language. Related: Paralinguistic.

Related entries & more 
paralegal (n.)

"one trained in subsidiary legal matters," 1972, from para- (1) + legal assistant.

Related entries & more 
paralipsis (n.)

"pretended or suggested omission for rhetorical effect," 1580s, from Greek paraleipsis "passing by omission," from paraleipein "to leave on one side, pass over, leave untold," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + leipein "to leave" (from PIE root *leikw- "to leave"). As in passages that open with "not to mention," "to say nothing of," etc.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
parallax (n.)

"apparent displacement of an object observed, due to an actual displacement of the observer," 1570s, from French parallaxe (mid-16c.), from Greek parallaxis "change, alteration, inclination of two lines meeting at an angle," from parallassein "to alter, make things alternate," from para- (see para- (1)) + allassein "to change," from allos "other" (from PIE root *al- "beyond"). Related: Parallactic.

Related entries & more 
parallel (v.)

1590s, transitive, "place in position parallel to something else," from parallel (n.). Meaning "make closely similar to something else" is from 1620s; intransitive sense of "be like or equal, agree" is from 1620s.

Related entries & more 
parallel (adj.)

1540s, in geometry, of lines, "lying in the same plane but never meeting in either direction;" of planes, "never meeting, however far extended;" from French parallèle (16c.) and directly from Latin parallelus, from Greek parallēlos "parallel," from para allēlois "beside one another," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + allēlois "each other," from allos "other" (from PIE root *al- "beyond"). Figurative sense of "having the same direction, tendency, or course" is from c. 1600.

As a noun from 1550s, "a line parallel to another line." Meanings "a comparison made by placing things side by side" and "thing equal to or resembling another in all particulars" are from 1590s.  Parallel bars as gymnastics apparatus is recorded from 1868.

Related entries & more 
parallelism (n.)

c. 1600, " parallel position," from Greek parallelismos, from parallelizein (see parallel). In literature, "correspondence resulting from repetition of the same sentiment, imagery, or construction" is from 1778.

Related entries & more 
parallelogram (n.)

"quadrilateral whose opposite sides are parallel," 1560s, from French parallélogramme (1550s) and directly from Late Latin parallelogrammum, from Greek parallelogrammon noun use of a neuter adjective meaning "bounded by parallel lines," from parallelos (see parallel) + stem of graphein "to write" (see -graphy). Related: Parallelogrammic; parallelogramical.

Related entries & more 

Page 36