Etymology
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papilla (n.)

plural papillae, 1690s, "a nipple of a mammary gland," from Latin papilla "nipple," diminutive of papula "swelling" (see pap (n.2)). Meaning "nipple-like protuberance" attested from 1713.

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papillary (adj.)

"of, pertaining to, or resembling a nipple," 1660s, from Latin papilla "nipple" (see papilla) + -ary.

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papilledema (n.)

also papilloedema, non-inflammatory swelling of the optic disc, 1908, from papilla + edema.

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papilloma (n.)

"a tumor resembling a nipple," 1866, a modern Latin hybrid from papilla "nipple" + -oma "tumor," which is from Greek.

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papillon (n.)

1907 as a breed of dog, from French papillon, literally "butterfly," from Latin papilionem (nominative papilio) "butterfly," which is perhaps from a reduplicated form of a PIE root *pl- "to fly, flutter." The Latin word is believed to be cognate with Old English fifealde, Old Saxon fifoldara, Old Norse fifrildi, Old High German vivaltra, German Falter "butterfly;" Old Prussian penpalo, Lithuanian piepala, Russian perepel "quail." The dog was so called for the shape of the ears. Middle English had papilloun "a butterfly," from Old French.

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papish (adj.)

1540s; regarded in Century Dictionary and other sources as a "corrupt or dialectal form of papist."

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papist (n.)

1530s, "adherent of the pope, one who acknowledges the supreme authority of the Church of Rome," from French papiste, from papa "pope," from Church Latin papa (see pope). Historically usually a term of anti-Catholic opprobrium. Related: Papism.

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papoose (n.)

"North American Indian baby or young child," commonly carried by its mother bound up and strapped to a board, 1630s, from Narragansett papoos "child," or a similar New England Algonquian word; said to mean literally "very young."

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paprika (n.)

condiment made from types of dried, ground sweet red peppers, 1839, from Hungarian paprika, a diminutive from Serbo-Croatian papar "pepper," from Latin piper or Modern Greek piperi (see pepper (n.)). A condiment made from a New World plant, introduced into Eastern Europe by the Turks; known in Hungary by 1569.

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Papuan (n.)

1814 in reference to the race that inhabits New Guinea (the large island north of Australia); earlier simply Papua (1610s), from Malay (Austronesian) papuah "frizzled." As an adjective by 1869.

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