Etymology
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pap (n.1)

"soft food for infants, gruel, porridge," late 14c., from Old French pape "watered gruel" and Medieval Latin papo, both from Latin pappa, a widespread word in children's language for "food" (compare Middle High German and Dutch pap, German Pappe, Spanish, Portuguese papa, Italian pappa), imitative of an infant's noise when hungry; possibly associated with pap (n.2). Meaning "over-simplified idea" first recorded 1540s.

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Pap test (n.)
1963, short for Papanicolaou (1947) in reference to George Nicholas Papanicolaou (1883-1962), Greek-born U.S. anatomist who developed the technique of examining secreted cells to test for cancer.
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papa (n.)

"father," 1680s, from French papa, from Latin papa, originally a reduplicated child's word, similar to Greek pappa (vocative) "o father," pappas "father," pappos "grandfather." The native word is daddy; according to OED the first use of papa was in courtly speech, as a continental affectation, and it was not used by common folk until late 18c.

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papacy (n.)

late 14c., papacie, "the office or jurisdiction of a pope," from Medieval Latin papatia "papal office," from Late Latin papa "pope" (see pope). Old English had papdom in this sense. Meaning "the succession or line of popes; the system of ecclesiastical government based upon authority of the Bishop of Rome over the Church" is from 1540s.

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papal (adj.)

"of a pope, relating to a pope in his official capacity," late 14c., from Old French papal (late 14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin papalis "pertaining to the pope," from papa (see pope).

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paparazzi (n.)

1961, from Italian Paparazzo (plural paparazzi) surname of the freelance photographer in Federico Fellini's 1959 film "La Dolce Vita." The surname itself is of no special significance in the film; it is said to be a common one in Calabria, and Fellini is said to have borrowed it from a travel book, "By the Ionian Sea," in which occurs the name of hotel owner Coriolano Paparazzo.

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papaverous (adj.)

"pertaining to or resembling the poppy," 1640s, from Latin papaver "poppy" (see poppy) + -ous.

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papaw (n.)
1620s, variant of papaya (q.v.), used from 1760 to designate the papaw tree.
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papaya (n.)

1590s of the fruit, 1610s of the tree, from Spanish, probably from Arawakan (West Indies) papaya.

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