Etymology
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overt (adj.)

early 14c., "open; unfastened" (originally literal, of clothing, a book, etc.; this sense is now obsolete), from Old French overt (Modern French ouvert), past participle of ovrir "to open," from Latin aperire "to open, uncover," from PIE compound *ap-wer-yo- from *ap- "off, away" (see apo-) + root *wer- (4) "to cover." Compare Latin operire "to cover," from the same root with PIE prefix *op- "over;" and Lithuanian atverti "open," užverti "shut." The meaning "clear, open or plain to view, manifest, revealed" is from late 14c.

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overtly (adv.)

"in an overt manner," early 14c., from overt + -ly (2).

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apert (adj.)
"open, evident, undisguised," early 14c., from Old French apert "obvious, evident, visible, plain to see," and directly from Latin apertus "open, uncovered, unclosed," past participle of aperire "to open, uncover" (see overt). Related: Apertly.
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apricate (v.)
1690s, "to bask in the sun," from Latin apricatus, past participle of apricari "to bask in the sun," from apricus "exposed" (to the sun); perhaps contracted from *apericus, from aperire "to open" (see overt). Transitive sense is recorded from 1851. Related: Aprication.
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overture (n.)

mid-13c., "an opening, an aperture;" early 15c. as "an introductory proposal, something offered to open the way to some conclusion," from Old French overture "opening; proposal" (Modern French ouverture), from Latin apertura "opening," from aperire "to open, uncover" (see overt).

The orchestral sense of "a movement serving as a prelude or introduction to an extended work" in English is recorded from 1660s.

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pert (adj.)

mid-13c., "evident, unconcealed, manifest, apparent to the eye;" early 14c., "attractive, comely, of good appearance," shortened form of Middle English apert "open, frank," from Old French apert, from Latin apertus, past participle of aperire "to open" (see overt). Sense of "saucy, impudent" is recorded from late 14c. Less pejorative meaning "lively, brisk, in good spirits" (c. 1500) survives in U.S. dialectal peart (with Middle English alternative spelling). Related: Pertly; pertness.

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external (adj.)

early 15c., "overt;" by 1590s as "situated or lying outside," from Latin externus "outside, outward" (from exterus; see exterior) + -al (1). This version won out over exterial. Related: Externally.

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overtime (n.)

1846, "time above the regular hours of work, time during which one works beyond the regular hours," from over- + time (n.). In reference to the pay given for this by 1916. Sporting sense first attested 1921, in an ice hockey context.

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overtower (v.)

"tower or soar too high," 1830, from over- + tower (v.). Related: Overtowered; overtowering.

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overtop (v.)

"rise above or beyond the top of," 1560s, from over- + top (v.). Related: Overtopped; overtopping.

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