Etymology
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overcome (v.)

Old English ofercuman "to reach, overtake, move or pass over," also "to conquer, prevail over, defeat in combat" (the Devil, evil spirits, sin, temptation, etc.), from ofer (see over) + cuman "to come" (see come (v.)). A common Germanic compound (Middle Dutch overkomen, Old High German ubarqueman, German überkommen).

In reference to mental or chemical force, "to overwhelm, render helpless," it is in late Old English. Meaning "to surmount (a difficulty or obstacle); succeed, be successful" is from c. 1200. The Civil Rights anthem "We Shall Overcome" was put together c. 1950s from the lyrics of Charles Tindley's spiritual "I'll Overcome Some Day" (1901) and the melody from the pre-Civil War spiritual "No More Auction Block for Me." Related: Overcame; overcoming.

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unsurmountable (adj.)
"incapable of being overcome," 1701, from un- (1) "not" + surmountable.
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Boris 
Slavic masc. proper name, literally "fight," from Slavic root *bor- "to fight, overcome" (from PIE root *bhorh- "hole").
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mate (v.2)

"to checkmate," c. 1300, from Old French mater "to checkmate, defeat, overcome," from mat "checkmated" (see checkmate (v.)).

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overpower (v.)

"to overcome with superior power, vanquish by superior force," 1590s, from over- + power (v.). Related: Overpowered; overpowering; overpoweringly.

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get over (v.)
1680s, "overcome," from get (v.) + over (adv.). From 1712 as "recover from;" 1813 as "have done with."
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superable (adj.)
"surmountable," 1620s, from Latin superabilis "that may be overcome," from superare "to overcome, surmount, go over, rise above," from super "over" (from PIE root *uper "over") + -abilis (see -able). The negative formation insuperable is older and more common and superable may be a back-formation from it.
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evince (v.)

c. 1600, "disprove, confute," from French évincer "disprove, confute," from Latin evincere "conquer, overcome subdue, vanquish, prevail over; elicit by argument, prove," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + vincere "to overcome" (from nasalized form of PIE root *weik- (3) "to fight, conquer"). Meaning "show clearly" is late 18c. Not clearly distinguished from its doublet, evict, until 18c. Related: Evinced; evinces; evincing; evincible.

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overmaster (v.)

mid-14c., overmaistren, "overpower, overcome, subdue, vanquish," from over- + master (v.). Related: Overmastered; overmastering.

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indefeasible (adj.)
"not to be set aside or overcome," 1530s (implied in indefeasibly), from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + defeasible (see defeasance).
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