Etymology
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output (n.)

"quantity of material put out or produced in a given time," 1839, from out- + put (v.). Until c. 1880, "a technical term in the iron and coal trade" [OED]; by 1884 as "energy produced by a device or system." The verb is attested from mid-14c., originally "to expel, exclude" (a sense now obsolete); meaning "to produce" is from 1858.

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productivity (n.)
1809, "quality of being productive," from productive + -ity. An earlier word for this was productiveness (1727). Economic sense of "rate of output per unit" is from 1899.
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feedback (n.)
1920, in the electronics sense, "the return of a fraction of an output signal to the input of an earlier stage," from verbal phrase, from feed (v.) + back (adv.). Transferred use, "information about the results of a process" is attested by 1955.
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Stakhanovite (n.)
1935, from name of hard-working Soviet coal miner Aleksei Grigorevich Stakhanov (1906-1977), in reference to an efficiency system in which workers increase their piecework production and are rewarded with bonuses and privileges. Soviet authorities publicized his prodigious output as part of a campaign to increase productivity.
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monophonic (adj.)

of recordings, broadcasts, etc., "not stereo, having only one output signal," 1958, coined to be an opposite of stereophonic; from mono- "single" + -phonic, from Greek phōnē "sound, voice," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say." It was used earlier in music, "pertaining to a style of composition in which one voice-part predominates over the others" (opposed to polyphonic), by 1885.

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