Etymology
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outline (v.)

1762, "to draw in outline, draw the exterior lines of, sketch the main features of," from outline (n.). Meaning "to describe in general terms" is from 1847. Related: Outlined; outlining.

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outline (n.)

1660s, "lines by which a figure is delineated," from out- + line (v.). Literally the outer or exterior line, but used freely for the principal or distinguishing lines. Meaning "rough draft in words" is from 1759.

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adumbrate (v.)
1580s, "to outline, to sketch," from Latin adumbratus "sketched, shadowed in outline," also "feigned, unreal, sham, fictitious," past participle of adumbrare "cast a shadow over;" in painting, "to represent (a thing) in outline," from ad "to" (see ad-) + umbrare "to cast in shadow," from PIE root *andho- "blind; dark" (see umbrage). Meaning "to overshadow" is from 1660s in English. Related: Adumbrated; adumbrating.
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lineament (n.)

early 15c., liniament, "distinctive feature of the body, outline," from Latin lineamentum "contour, outline; a feature," literally "a line, stroke, mark," from lineare "to reduce to a straight line" (here apparently in an unrecorded sense "trace lines"), from linea "string, thread, line" (see line (n.)). Figurative sense of "a characteristic" is attested from 1630s.

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coastline (n.)

"the outline of a shore or coast," 1819, from coast (n.) + line (n.).

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profile (n.)

1650s, "a drawing of the outline of anything," especially "a representation of the human face in side view," from older Italian profilo "a drawing in outline," from profilare "to draw in outline," from pro "forth" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward") + filare "draw out, spin," from Late Latin filare "to spin, draw out a line," from filum "thread" (from PIE root *gwhi- "thread, tendon"). Meaning "a side view" is from 1660s. Meaning "biographical sketch, character study" is from 1734.

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adumbration (n.)

1550s, "faint sketch, imperfect representation," from Latin adumbrationem (nominative adumbratio) "a sketch in shadow, sketch, outline," noun of action from past-participle stem of adumbrare "to cast a shadow, overshadow," in painting, "represent (a thing) in outline," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + umbrare "to cast in shadow," from PIE root *andho- "blind; dark" (see umbrage).

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roofline (n.)

also roof-line, "the outline or silhouette of a roof or range of roofs," by 1829, from roof (n.) + line (n.).

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sketch (v.)
1690s, "present the essential facts of," from sketch (n.). Meaning "draw, portray in outline and partial shading" is from 1725. Related: Sketched; sketcher; sketching.
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scribe (v.)

mid-15c., scriben, "to write," from Latin scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). The carpentry sense "mark or score with (an outline)" is from 1670s, of uncertain origin, perhaps a shortening of describe. Related: Scribed; scriber; scribing.

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