Etymology
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os- 
frequent form of ob- before -c- and -t- in words from Latin.
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Oslo 

Norwegian capital city, a name probably based on Old Norse os "estuary, river mouth," in reference to the place's situation.

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Osmond 
masc. proper name, from Old English Osmund, literally "divine protection," from os "a god" (see Oscar) + -mund (see mount (n.1)).
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ossicle (n.)

"a small bone; small, hard, bone-like nodule," 1570s, from Latin ossiculum, diminutive of os "bone" (from PIE root *ost- "bone").

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oscitant (adj.)

"sleepy, drowsy, sluggish," literally "yawning, gaping," 1620s, from Latin oscitans "listless, sluggish, lazy," present participle of oscitare "to gape, yawn," from os citare "to move the mouth" (see oral and cite). Related: Oscitancy.

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osculate (v.)

"to kiss (one another)," 1650s, from Latin osculatus, past participle of osculari "to kiss," from osculum "a kiss; pretty mouth, sweet mouth," literally "little mouth," diminutive of os "mouth" (see oral). Related: Osculated; osculating; osculant; osculatory.

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ossification (n.)

1690s, "the formation of bones," from Latin ossis "of bones," genitive of os "bone" (from PIE root *ost- "bone") + -fication "a making or causing." From 1705 as "a bony formation." It is recorded earlier than ossify.

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Oswald 
masc. proper name, from Old English Osweald "god-power, god-ruler," from Old English os "god" (only in personal names), from PIE *ansu- "spirit" (see Oscar) + Old English (ge)weald "power."
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osseous (adj.)

"bony, made of bones," early 15c., ossuous, ossous, from Medieval Latin ossous, from Latin osseus "bony, of bone," from os (genitive ossis) "bone," from PIE root *ost- "bone." The word later was reformed in English (1680s), perhaps by influence of French osseux.

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ossify (v.)

1713, intransitive, "to harden like bone, become bone;" 1721, intransitive, "convert to bone;" a back-formation from ossification, or else modeled on French ossifier (18c.) and formed from Latin os (genitive ossis) "bone" (from PIE root *ost- "bone") + -fy. Figurative sense "become rigid and fixed" (of thought, customs, etc.) is by 1858. Related: Ossified; ossifying.

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