Etymology
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Orlando 
masc. proper name, Italian form of Roland (q.v.). The city in Florida, U.S., so called from 1857, supposedly in honor of a U.S. soldier, Orlando Reeves, who was killed there in 1835 by Seminoles. It had been settled c. 1844 as Jernigan.
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rodomontade (n.)

1610s (earlier rodomontado, 1590s), "vain boasting like that of Rodomonte," a character in Ariosto's "Orlando Furioso" (earlier in Boiardo's "Orlando Innamorato," Century Dictionary describes him as "a brave but somewhat boastful leader of the Saracens against Charlemagne." In dialectal Italian the name means literally "one who rolls (away) the mountain." As a verb, "boast, brag, talk big," by 1680s. Related: Rodomont "braggart" (1590s); Rodomontador.

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furious (adj.)
late 14c., "impetuous, unrestrained," from Old French furios, furieus "furious, enraged, livid" (14c., Modern French furieux), from Latin furiosus "full of rage, mad," from furia "rage, passion, fury" (see fury). Furioso, from the Italian form of the word, was used in English 17c.-18c. for "an enraged person," probably from Ariosto's "Orlando Furioso."
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