Etymology
Advertisement
organism (n.)

1660s, "organic structure, organization" (a sense now rare or obsolete), from organize + -ism. Sense of "living animal or plant, body exhibiting organic life" is by 1842. Related: Organismic; organismal.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
micro-organism (n.)

also microorganism, "a microscopic organism," 1855, from micro- + organism.

Related entries & more 
cyborg (n.)

"a man-machine hybrid, a human modified by integrated machinery to have extended powers," 1960, a blend of the first elements of cybernetic and organism.

Related entries & more 
*werg- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to do."

It forms all or part of: allergic; allergy; argon; boulevard; bulwark; cholinergic; demiurge; dramaturge; energy; erg (n.1) "unit of energy;" ergative; ergonomics; ergophobia; George; georgic; handiwork; irk; lethargic; lethargy; liturgy; metallurgy; organ; organelle; organic; organism; organize; orgy; surgeon; surgery; synergism; synergy; thaumaturge; work; wright; wrought; zymurgy.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek ergon "work," orgia "religious performances;" Armenian gorc "work;" Avestan vareza "work, activity;" Gothic waurkjan, Old English wyrcan "to work," Old English weorc "deed, action, something done;" Old Norse yrka "work, take effect."

Related entries & more 
polymorph (n.)

"organism of several forms; an individual organism which differs from others of the same group or species," 1828, from Greek polymorphos "of many forms" (see polymorphous). Related: Polymorphic (1816).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
biolysis (n.)

1865, "the destruction of life," later more specifically "dissolution of a living organism, resolution of a dead organism into its constituent matter" (1880s); see bio- + -lysis. Related: Biolytic.

Related entries & more 
pathogen (n.)

also pathogene, "disease-producing micro-organism," 1880, a back-formation from pathogenic.

Related entries & more 
in vivo 

1898, Latin; "within a living organism," from vivere "to live" (see vital).

Related entries & more 
autoimmune (adj.)

also auto-immune, "arising from an abnormal immune response to a normal body part," 1952, from auto- + immune. Related: Autoimmunity, attested by 1903 as "immunity, natural or acquired, effected by the unaided powers of the organism, independent of external agencies." The modern sense of "immune responses of an organism against its own healthy cells and tissues" is from 1950s.

Related entries & more 
zoon (n.)

"animal form containing all elements of a typical organism of its group," 1864, from Greek zōon "animal," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."

Related entries & more