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opposition (n.)

late 14c., opposicioun, an astrological term for the situation of two heavenly bodies exactly across from one another in the heavens, from Old French oposicion (12c.) and directly from Latin oppositionem (nominative oppositio) "act of opposing, a placing against," noun of action from past-participle stem of opponere "set against," from assimilated form of ob "in front of, in the way of" (see ob-) + ponere "to put, set, place" (see position (n.)).

General sense of "the position of that which faces or confronts something else" is from c. 1400. The meaning "that which is opposite something else" is from 1540s; meaning "act of resisting, antagonism" is attested from 1580s; sense of "
body of opposers," especially "the political party opposed to the one in power" is from 1704.

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oppositional (adj.)

"of or pertaining to opposition," 1680s, from opposition + -al (1). Originally in the astronomical sense of opposition; the general sense of "having the character of hostile action" is from 1829.

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antithetic (adj.)
"containing an antithesis," c. 1600, from Greek antithetikos "contrasting, setting in opposition," from antithetos "placed in opposition," from antithesis "opposition, resistance," literally "a placing against" (see antithesis).
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antitheism (n.)
also anti-theism, "opposition to theism; opposition to belief in God or gods," 1788; see anti- + theism.
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antithetical (adj.)
"of the nature of or containing a (rhetorical) antithesis," 1580s, from Greek antithetikos "setting in opposition," from antithetos "placed in opposition," from antithesis "opposition, resistance," literally "a placing against" (see antithesis) + -al (1). General sense of "characterized by direct opposition" is from 1848. Related: Antithetically.
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contrariness (n.)

late 14c., "state of being contrary, opposition, antagonism," from contrary + -ness. Meaning "fondness of opposition, habitual obstinacy" is from 1640s.

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anti-war (adj.)
also antiwar, 1812, American English, in reference to opposition to the War of 1812, from anti- + war (n.). In a non-specific sense of "political pacifism, opposition to all war," 1821.
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antithesis (n.)
1520s, "opposition, contrast," originally in rhetoric, "the bringing of contrary ideas or terms in close opposition;" 1530s as "that which is in (rhetorical) opposition or contrast," from Late Latin antithesis, from Greek antithesis "opposition, resistance," literally "a placing against," also a term in logic and rhetoric, noun of action from antitithenai "to set against, oppose," a term in logic, from anti "against" (see anti-) + tithenai "to put, place," from reduplicated form of PIE root *dhe- "to set, put."

The extended sense of "direct or striking opposition" is from 1630s; as "that which is the direct opposite" from 1831.
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repugnance (n.)

early 15c., repugnaunce, "logical contradiction, inconsistency; incompatibility; resistance, opposition"(senses now obsolete), from Old French repugnance "opposition, resistance" (13c.) or directly from Latin repugnantia "incompatibility," from stem of repugnare "resist, disagree, be incompatible," from re- "back" (see re-) + pugnare "to fight" (from PIE root *peuk- "to prick"). The meaning "mental opposition or antagonism, aversion, strong dislike" is from 1640s. Related: Repugnancy.

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antarchy (n.)
"opposition to government," 1650s, from anti- "against, opposed to" + -archy "rule." Related: Antarchic.
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