Advertisement
60 entries found.
Search filter: All Results 
ocean (n.)

c. 1300, occean, "the vast body of water on the surface of the globe," from Old French occean "ocean" (12c., Modern French océan), from Latin oceanus, from Greek ōkeanos, the great river or sea surrounding the disk of the Earth (as opposed to the Mediterranean), a word of unknown origin; Beekes suggests it is Pre-Greek. Personified as Oceanus, son of Uranus and Gaia and husband of Tethys.

In early times, when the only known land masses were Eurasia and Africa, the ocean was an endless river that flowed around them. Until c. 1650, commonly ocean sea, translating Latin mare oceanum. Application to individual bodies of water began 14c. (occean Atlantyke, 1387); five of them are usually reckoned, but this is arbitrary. The English word also occasionally was applied to smaller subdivisions, such as German Ocean "North Sea."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
oceanic (adj.)

"belonging or relating to the ocean," 1650s, probably from French océanique, from océan (see ocean).

Related entries & more 
oceanography (n.)

"the science of the oceans," 1859, coined in English from ocean + -graphy; on analogy of geography. French océanographie is attested from 1580s but is said to have been rare before 1876. Related: Oceanographic.

Related entries & more 
Indian Ocean 
first attested 1515 in Modern Latin (Oceanus Orientalis Indicus), named for India, which projects into it; earlier it was the Eastern Ocean, as opposed to the Western Ocean (Atlantic) before the Pacific was surmised.
Related entries & more 
oceanographer (n.)

"a student of the seas, one who systematically studies the ocean," 1886, agent noun from oceanography.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
trans-oceanic (adj.)
1827, "situated across the ocean," from trans- + oceanic. Meaning "passing over the sea" is recorded from 1868.
Related entries & more 
Sumatra 
said to be from Sanskrit Samudradvipa "ocean-island." Related: Sumatran.
Related entries & more 
abyssal (adj.)
1690s, "unfathomable, unsearchably deep, like an abyss," from abyss + -al (1). Since 19c. mainly "inhabiting or belonging to the depths of the ocean" (used especially of the zone of ocean water below 300 fathoms), though in 19c. abysmal was more common in oceanography.
Related entries & more 
deep-sea (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the deeper parts of the ocean," 1620s, from deep (adj.) + sea.

Related entries & more 
high seas (n.)
late 14c., from sea (n.) + high (adj.) with sense (also found in the Latin cognate) of "deep" (compare Old English heahflod "deep water," also Old Persian baršan "height; depth"). Originally "open sea or ocean," later "ocean area not within the territorial boundary of any nation."
Related entries & more