Etymology
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observe (v.)

late 14c., observen, "to hold to (a manner of life or course of conduct), carry out the dictates of, attend to in practice, to keep, follow," from Old French observer, osserver "to observe, watch over, follow" (10c.), from Latin observare "watch over, note, heed, look to, attend to, guard, regard, comply with," from ob "in front of, before" (see ob-) + servare "to watch, keep safe," from PIE root *ser- (1) "to protect." Sense of "watch, perceive, notice" is from 1560s, via the notion of "see and note omens." Meaning "to say by way of remark" is from c. 1600. Related: Observed; observing.

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unobserved (adj.)
1610s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of observe (v.).
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observative (adj.)

"of or pertaining to observation," 1610s, from Latin observat-, past-participle stem of observare "watch over, note, heed, look to, attend to, guard, regard, comply with" (see observe) + -ive.

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observer (n.)

1550s, "one who keeps a rule, custom, etc.," agent noun from observe. Meaning "one who watches and takes notice" is from 1580s; this is the sense of the word in many newspaper names. Meaning "one who observes without participating" (at a meeting, conference, etc.) is by 1925.

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observant (adj.)

c. 1600, "attentive in perceiving or taking notice, characterized by good powers of observation," also "attentive in observing what is prescribed or required" (a law, custom, etc.), from observe + -ant, or else from French observant, past participle of observer (see observance). In reference to Judaism, "strict in acting in accordance with precepts," from 1902. As a noun from late 15c. Related: Observantly; observantness.

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inspect (v.)
1620s, from Latin inspectus, past participle of inspicere "look at, observe, view; look into, inspect, examine," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + specere "to look" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Related: Inspected; inspecting.
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eye (v.)
early 15c., "cause to see;" 1560s, "behold, observe," from eye (n.). Related: Eyed; eyeing.
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introspect (v.)
1680s, "to look into" (transitive), from Latin introspectus, past participle of introspicere "look at, look into; examine, observe attentively," from intro- "inward" (see intro-) + specere "to look at" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Meaning "look within, search one's feelings or thoughts" is from 1875, a back-formation from introspection. Related: Introspected; introspecting.
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introspection (n.)
1670s, "action of closely inspecting or examining," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin introspicere "to look into, look at, examine, observe attentively," from intro- "inward" (see intro-) + specere "to look at" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Meaning "action of searching one's feelings or thoughts" is from 1807.
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scrutinize (v.)

"observe or investigate closely," 1670s, from scrutiny + -ize. Related: Scrutinized; scrutinizing. The earlier verb was scrutine (1590s), from French scrutine, from Late Latin scrutinium.

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