Etymology
Advertisement
null (adj.)

"void of legal force, invalid," 1560s, from French nul, from Latin nullus "not any, none," from ne- "not, no" (from PIE root *ne- "not") + illus "any," diminutive of unus "one" (from PIE root *oi-no- "one, unique").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hypothesis (n.)

1590s, "a particular statement;" 1650s, "a proposition, assumed and taken for granted, used as a premise," from French hypothese and directly from Late Latin hypothesis, from Greek hypothesis "base, groundwork, foundation," hence in extended use "basis of an argument, supposition," literally "a placing under," from hypo- "under" (see hypo-) + thesis "a placing, proposition" (from reduplicated form of PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). A term in logic; narrower scientific sense is from 1640s.

Related entries & more 
hypothetical (adj.)

"founded on or characterized by a hypothesis, conjectural," 1580s, from Latinized form of Greek hypothetikos "pertaining to a hypothesis," from hypothesis (see hypothesis). Hypothetic (1670s) is less common. Related: Hypothetically.

Related entries & more 
nullify (v.)

"render legally null and void, render invalid," 1590s, from Late Latin nullificare "to esteem lightly, despise," literally "to make nothing," from Latin nullus "not any" (see null) + combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Nullified; nullifying; nullifier.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hypothesize (v.)

"to form hypotheses," 1738, from hypothesis + -ize. Hypothetize is an alternative form, preserving the consonant of the Greek base. Related: Hypothesized; hypothesizing.

Related entries & more 
supposition (n.)
early 15c., a term in logic, "assumption, hypothesis," from Medieval Latin suppositionem (nominative suppositio) "assumption, hypothesis, a supposition," noun of action from past participle stem of supponere (see suppose); influenced by Greek hypothesis. In classical Latin, "a putting under, substitution." Earlier in English in the same sense was supposal (late 14c.). Related: Suppositional; suppositionally.
Related entries & more 
nullity (n.)

1560s, "state or quality of being legally null and void," from French nullité (14c.) or directly from Medieval Latin nullitalis, from Latin nullus "not any" (see null). From 1580s as "a state of nothingness;" in reference to persons, "a non-entity," by 1650s.

Related entries & more 
nullifidian (n.)

"one of no faith or religion," 1560s, from Latin nulli-, combining form of nullus "no" (see null) + fides "faith" (from PIE root *bheidh- "to trust, confide, persuade"). As an adjective from 1620s.

Related entries & more 
negate (v.)

"deny, make negative or null," 1795 (with an isolated use from 1620s), a back-formation from negation, or else from Latin negatus, past participle of negare, from PIE root *ne- "not." Related: Negated; negates; negating.

Related entries & more