Etymology
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now (adv.)

Middle English nou, from Old English nu "at the present time, at this moment, immediately; now that," also used as an interjection and as an introductory word; from Proto-Germanic *nu (source also of Old Norse nu, Dutch nu, Old Frisian nu, German nun, Gothic nu "now"), from PIE *nu "now" (source also of Sanskrit and Avestan nu, Old Persian nuram, Hittite nuwa, Greek nu, nun, Latin nunc, Old Church Slavonic nyne, Lithuanian , Old Irish nu-). Perhaps originally "newly, recently," and related to the root of new.

Since Old English often merely emphatic, without a temporal sense (as in now then, which is attested from early 13c.). As a noun, "the present time," from late 14c. The adjective meaning "up to date" was revived by 1967, but the word was used also as an adjective with the sense of "current" from late 14c. through 18c. Now and then "occasionally, at one time and another" is from mid-15c.; now or never attested from early 13c. (nu oþer neure).

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nowadays (adv.)

"in these times, at the present," late 14c., contracted from Middle English nou adayes (mid-14c.), from now + adayes "during the day" (see adays).

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hic et nunc 
Latin, literally "here and now," from demonstrative pronominal adjective of place hic "this, here" + nunc "now" (see now).
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quidnunc (n.)

"gossip-monger, one who is curious to know everything that happens," 1709 (as two words), etymologically "what now?" From Latin quid "what?" (neuter of interrogative pronoun quis "who?" from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns) and nunc "now" (see now), to describe someone forever asking "What's the news?"

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respectively (adv.)

mid-15c., respectiveli, "relatively" (a sense now obsolete); 1580s, "respectfully" (a sense now archaic); 1620s, "relatively to each of several singly," from respective (adj.) + -ly (2).

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coo (v.)

1660s, "to utter a low, plaintive, murmuring sound," echoic of doves. Compare, in the same sense, Danish kurre, German girren; also Hindi kuku "the cooing of a dove," Persian huhu "a dove," and see cuckoo.

Meaning "to utter by cooing" is from 1798. Meaning "to converse affectionately, make love in murmuring endearments" is from 1816. Related: Cooing. The noun is recorded from 1729.

What are you doing now,
   Oh Thomas Moore?
What are you doing now,
   Oh Thomas Moore?
Sighing or suing now,
Rhyming or wooing now,
Billing or cooing now,
   Which, Thomas Moore? 
[Lord Byron, from "To Thomas Moore," 1816]
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big-boned (adj.)
"stout," 1580s, now often considered euphemistic.
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e'er 
variant spelling of ever, now archaic or poetic.
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linch (n.)
Old English lynis "linchpin," now obsolete; see linchpin.
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sometimes (adv.)
"now and then," 1520s, from sometime + adverbial genitive -s.
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