Etymology
Advertisement
notable (adj.)

mid-14c., "worthy of note, important, praiseworthy," from Old French notable "well-known, notable, remarkable" (13c.), from Latin notabilis "noteworthy, extraordinary," from notare "to mark, note, make a note," from nota "mark, sign, means of recognition" (see note (n.)). Meaning "well-known, prominent, worthy of respect" is from early 15c. The noun meaning "a person of distinction" is recorded by 1815. Related: Notably; notableness.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
notabilia (n.)

"notable things," from Latin notabilia, neuter plural of notabilis "noteworthy" (see notable).

Related entries & more 
notability (n.)

mid-14c., notabilite, "a noteworthy observation or circumstance," from Old French notabilite and directly from Medieval Latin *notabilitatem (nominative *notabilitas), from Latin notabilis "noteworthy" (see notable). From early 15c. as "excellence, pre-eminence." In late 18c.-early 19c. also "housewifely industry."

Related entries & more 
signal (adj.)

"remarkable, striking, notable," 1640s, an irregular adoption (by influence of the noun) from French signalé, past participle of signaler "to distinguish, signal" (see signal (n.)). The notion is "serving as a sign."

Related entries & more 
cephalopod (n.)

one of a class of mollusks notable for having tentacles attached to a distinct head, 1825, from French cephalopode, from Modern Latin Cephalopoda (the class name), from Greek kephalē "head" (see cephalo-) + pod-, stem of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
decorous (adj.)

1660s, "suitable, appropriate;" 1670s, "characterized by or notable for decorum, formally polite and proper," from Latin decorus "becoming, seemly, fitting, proper," from decus (genitive decoris) "an ornament," "to decorate, adorn, embellish, beautify," from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept" (on the notion of "to add grace"). Related: Decorously; decorousness.

Related entries & more 
Swiss (n.)

1510s, from French Suisse, from Middle High German Suizer, from Suiz "Switzerland" (see Switzerland and compare Switzer (1570s), archaic word for "a Swiss," and German Schweiz). As an adjective from 1520s. Swiss banks were notable for assuring anonymity and security by 1949. Swiss cheese is attested from 1808; as a type of something full of holes, from 1924.

Related entries & more 
pachysandra (n.)

genus of small, evergreen plants, 1813, from Modern Latin (Andre Michaux,1803), from Greek pakhys "thick" (see pachy-) + anēr (genitive andros) "man" (from PIE root *ner- (2) "man"), which is used in botany to mean "stamen, having stamens" (the plant is notable for its four stamens).

Related entries & more 
rondeau (n.)

"a short poem in fixed form; a metrical form of 10 or 13 lines with but two rhymes," 1520s, from French rondeau, from Old French rondel "short poem" (see rondel). "In Flanders Fields" and "Jenny Kiss'd Me" are notable English examples.

Related entries & more 
flagellant (n.)

late 16c., "one who whips or scourges himself for religious discipline," from Latin flagellantem (nominative flagellans), present participle of flagellare "to scourge, lash" (see flagellum). There were notable outbreaks of it in 1260 and 1340s. As an adjective, "given to flagellation," 1880.

Related entries & more