Etymology
Advertisement
al dente (adv.)
1935, Italian, literally "to the tooth," from Latin dentem (nominative dens) "tooth" (from PIE root *dent- "tooth"). Italian al represents a contraction of words from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + ille "that" (see le).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
sotto voce 

1737, Italian, literally "under voice," from sotto, from Latin subtus "below" (source also of French sous; see sub-) + voce, from Latin vocem (nominative vox) "voice, sound, utterance" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

Related entries & more 
quid pro quo 

"one thing in place of another," 1560s, from Latin, literally "something for something, one thing for another," from nominative (quid) and ablative (quo) neuter singulars of relative pronoun qui "who" (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns) + pro "for" (see pro-).

Related entries & more 
hoi polloi (n.)
1837, from Greek hoi polloi (plural) "the people," literally "the many" (plural of polys, from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill"). Used in Greek by Dryden (1668) and Byron (1822), in both cases preceded by the, even though Greek hoi means "the," a mistake repeated often by subsequent writers who at least have the excuse of ignorance of Greek. Ho "the" is from PIE *so- "this, that" (nominative), cognate with English the and Latin sic. From the adjective agoraios "pertaining to the agora; frequenting the market" Greek had hoi agoraioi "loungers in the market, loafers, common, low men."
Related entries & more