Etymology
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designated (adj.)

1868, "appointed or nominated but not yet installed," past-participle adjective from designate (v.). The baseball designated hitter "substitute named before the start of a game to hit for the pitcher" was introduced in the American League in 1973; it soon gave wide figurative extension to designated, as in designated driver (by 1985).

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designate (adj.)

early 15c., "marked out, indicated" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin designatus, past participle of designare "mark out, devise, choose, designate, appoint," from de "out" (see de-) + signare "to mark," from signum "identifying mark, sign" (see sign (n.)). Meaning "appointed or nominated but not yet installed" is from 1640s.

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postulate (n.)

1580s, "a request, demand, petition," from Latin postulātum "demand, request," properly "that which is requested," noun use of neuter past participle of postulare "to ask, demand; claim; require" (see postulate (v.)).

The sense in logic, "proposition proposed for acceptance without proof, something taken for granted," is from 1640s, from a sense in Medieval Latin. The meaning "self-evident practical proposition" is by 1751. The earlier noun in English was postulation "a petition, request" (c. 1400). Middle English also had postulate (adj.) "nominated to a bishopric or archbishopric" (mid-15c.).

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nominate (v.)

1540s, "to call or mention by name" (common in 17c., but now rare or obsolete), a back-formation from nomination or else from Latin nominatus, past participle of nominare "to name, call by name, give a name to," also "name for office," from nomen "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name"). Later "to appoint or designate by name to some office or duty" (1560s); "to propose or formally enter (someone's name) as a candidate for election" (c. 1600). It also occasionally was used from c. 1600 with a sense "give a name to." Related: Nominated; nominating.

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