Etymology
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nominal (adj.)

mid-15c., nominalle, "pertaining to nouns," from Latin nominalis "pertaining to a name or names," from nomen (genitive nominis) "name," which is cognate with Old English nama (from PIE root *no-men- "name"). Meaning "of the nature of names" (in distinction to things) is from 1610s. Meaning "being so in name only" is recorded from 1620s.

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nominally (adv.)
1660s, "as regards a name," from nominal + -ly (2). Meaning "in name only" (as opposed to really) is attested from 1748.
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nominalism (n.)

"the view that treats abstract concepts as names only, not realities; the doctrine that common nouns are mere conveniences in thought or speech, representing nothing in the real things," 1820, from French nominalisme (1752), from nominal, from Latin nominalis "pertaining to a name or names" (see nominal). Related: Nominalist (1650s); nominalistic.

Medieval thinkers, especially those of the twelfth century, are classified as being either nominalists or realists; modern philosophers have generally joined in the condemnation of medieval realism, but have nevertheless been mostly rather realists than nominalists. [Century Dictionary, 1895]
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nom (n.)

French for "name" (9c.), from Latin nomen (see nominal). It is used in various phrases in English, such as nom de guerre (1670s) "fictitious name used by a person engaged in some action," literally "war name" and formerly in France a name taken by a soldier on entering the service, and nom de théâtre "stage name" (1874). Nom de plume (1823) "pseudonym used by a writer," literally "pen name," is a phrase invented in English in imitation of nom de guerre. Fowler suggests it is "ridiculous for English writers to use a French phrase that does not come from France."

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*no-men- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "name."

It forms all or part of: acronym; allonym; ananym; anonymous; antonomasia; antonym; binomial; caconym; cognomen; denominate; eponym; eponymous; heteronym; homonym; homonymous; hyponymy; ignominious; ignominy; innominable; Jerome; matronymic; metonymy; metronymic; misnomer; moniker; name; nomenclature; nominal; nominate; noun; onomastic; onomatopoeia; paronomasia; paronym; patronym; patronymic; praenomen; pronoun; pseudonym; renown; synonym; synonymy; synonymous; toponym.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit nama; Avestan nama; Greek onoma, onyma; Latin nomen; Old Church Slavonic ime, genitive imene; Russian imya; Old Irish ainm; Old Welsh anu "name;" Old English nama, noma, Old High German namo, Old Norse nafn, Gothic namo "name."

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token (adj.)

"nominal," 1915, from token (n.). In integration sense, attested by 1960.

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samurai (n.)
1727, from Japanese samurai "warrior, knight," originally the military retainer of the daimio, variant of saburai, nominal form of sabura(h)u "to be in attendance, to serve."
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ptosis (n.)

"a falling of or inability to raise the upper eyelid," 1743, from Greek ptōsis, literally "falling, a fall," also "the case of a noun," nominal derivative of piptein "to fall" (from PIE *pi-pt-, reduplicated form of root *pet- "to rush; to fly"). In English, especially of the eyelid. Related: Ptotic.

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quit-rent (n.)

early 15c., "rent paid by a tenant of a manor in exchange for being discharged from required service;" also, "nominal rent as acknowledgment of tenure," from quit (adj.) + rent (n.).

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-ling 
diminutive word-forming element, early 14c., from Old English -ling a nominal suffix (not originally diminutive), from Proto-Germanic *-linga-; attested in historical Germanic languages as a simple suffix, but probably representing a fusion of two suffixes: 1. that represented by English -el (1), as in thimble, handle; and 2. -ing, suffix indicating "person or thing of a specific kind or origin;" in masculine nouns also "son of" (as in farthing, atheling, Old English horing "adulterer, fornicator"), from PIE *-(i)ko- (see -ic).

Both these suffixes had occasional diminutive force, but this was only slightly evident in Old English -ling and its equivalents in Germanic languages except Norse, where it commonly was used as a diminutive suffix, especially in words designating the young of animals (such as gæslingr "gosling"). Thus it is possible that the diminutive use that developed in Middle English is from Old Norse.
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