Etymology
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neophyte (n.)

c. 1400, neophite, "new convert" (modern spelling from 16c.), from Church Latin neophytus, from Greek neophytos "a new convert; one newly initiated," noun use of adjective meaning "newly initiated, newly converted," literally "newly planted," from neos "new" (see new) + phytos "grown; planted," verbal adjective of phyein "to bring forth, make grow," from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow."

Church sense is from I Timothy iii.6. Rare before 19c. General sense of "one who is new to any subject" is recorded from 1590s. As an adjective, "newly entered into some state," c. 1600.

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*bheue- 

*bheuə-, also *bheu-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to be, exist, grow."

It forms all or part of: Bauhaus; be; beam; Boer; bondage; boodle; boom (n.1) "long pole;" boor; booth; bound (adj.2) "ready to go;" bower; bowery; build; bumpkin; busk; bustle (v.) "be active;" byre; bylaw; Eisteddfod; Euphues; fiat; forebear; future; husband; imp; Monophysite; neighbor; neophyte; phyletic; phylo-; phylum; phylogeny; physic; physico-; physics; physio-; physique; -phyte; phyto-; symphysis.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit bhavah "becoming," bhavati "becomes, happens," bhumih "earth, world;" Greek phyein "to bring forth, make grow," phytos, phyton "a plant," physis "growth, nature," phylon "tribe, class, race," phyle "tribe, clan;" Old English beon "be, exist, come to be, become, happen;" Old Church Slavonic byti "be," Greek phu- "become," Old Irish bi'u "I am," Lithuanian būti "to be," Russian byt' "to be."

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newcomer (n.)

"recent arrival, a stranger newly arrived," mid-15c., with agent noun ending + new-come (past-participle adjective) "just arrived," c. 1200, from Old English niwe cumen; see new + come (v.). Old English also used niwcumen as a noun meaning "newcomer, neophyte."

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