Etymology
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Luddite (n.)

also luddite, 1811, the name taken by an organized band of weavers in Midlands and northern England who for about 5 years thereafter destroyed machinery, for fear it would deprive them of work. Supposedly they got it from Ned Ludd, a Leicestershire worker who in 1779 had smashed two machines in a rage, but that story first was told in 1847. Applied by 1961 to modern spurners of automation and technology. As an adjective from 1812.

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neo- 

word-forming element meaning "new, young, recent," used in a seemingly endless number of adjectives and nouns, mostly coined since c. 1880, from Greek neos "new, young, youthful; fresh, strange; lately, just now," from PIE root *newo- (see new). In the physical sciences, caeno-, ceno- is used in the same sense. Paleo- is opposed to both.

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neo-conservative (n.)

also neoconservative; used in the modern sense by 1979:

My Republican vote [in the 1972 presidential election] produced little shock waves in the New York intellectual community. It didn't take long — a year or two — for the socialist writer Michael Harrington to come up with the term "neoconservative" to describe a renegade liberal like myself. To the chagrin of some of my friends, I decided to accept that term; there was no point calling myself a liberal when no one else did. [Irving Kristol, "Forty Good Years," The Public Interest, spring 2005]

The term is attested from by 1964 (neo-conservatism is by 1959; new conservative is from mid-1950s), originally often applied to Russell Kirk and his followers, who would be philosophically opposed to the later neocons. From neo- "new" + conservative (n.).

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neo-classical 

also neoclassical, style of art, architecture, etc., influenced by classical patterns, 1859, especially in reference to 18th century English literature; from neo- + classical. Related: Neo-classicism/neoclassicism.

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neo-liberal (adj., n.)

also neoliberal, by 1958, earliest in reference to French politics and theology, from neo- "new" + liberal. Related: Neo-liberalism.

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Neo-Nazi (n., adj.)

by 1950 in reference to Nazi-inspired movements, ideologies, or persons (or those thought to be) after the fall of the Third Reich; from neo- "new" + Nazi.

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neonatal (adj.)

also neo-natal, "relating to newborn children," 1883, from neo- + natal.

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neocolonialism (n.)

also neo-colonialism, "the exertion of influence or control over other nations, especially former dependencies, without direct military or political control," 1955, from neo- "new" + colonialism.

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Neoplatonism (n.)

also Neo-platonism, 1827 in reference to a philosophical and religious system mixing Platonic ideas and oriental mysticism, originating 3c. at Alexandria, especially in writings of Plotinus, Porphyry, and Proclus; see neo- "new" + Platonism. The last Neoplatonic schools were suppressed in 6c. Neoplatonian is attested from 1831. Related: Neoplatonic; Neoplatonist.

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neogamist (n.)

"one recently married," 1650s; see neo- "new" + -gamy "marriage."

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