Etymology
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neglect (v.)

1520s, "omit to do or perform;" 1530s, "treat carelessly or heedlessly, treat with disrespect or without proper attention or care;" from Latin neglectus, past participle of neglegere "to make light of, disregard, be indifferent to, not heed, not trouble oneself about," literally "not to pick up," variant of neclegere, from Old Latin nec "not" (from PIE root *ne- "not") + legere "pick up, select," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather." Related: Neglected; neglecting.

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neglect (n.)

1580s, "act of treating with slight attention;" 1590s, "omission, oversight, want of attention to what ought to be done;" from neglect (v.) or from Latin neglectus "a neglecting," noun use of past participle of neglegere.

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neglected (adj.)

"not treated with proper care or attention," c. 1600, past-participle adjective from neglect (v.). Related: Neglectedness.

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neglectful (adj.)

"characterized by inattention or indifference," 1640s, from neglect (n.) + -ful. Related: Neglectfully; neglectfulness. Earlier in same sense was neglective (1610s).

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neglection (n.)

"neglect, negligence," 1590s, but by 1700 surviving only as a word in Shakespeare, from Latin neglectionem (nominative neglectio) "a neglecting," noun of action from past-participle stem of neglegere (see neglect (v.)).

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negligent (adj.)

late 14c., necligent, of persons, "remiss, indifferent to duty," from Old French negligent "careless, negligent" (13c.) and directly from Latin negligentem (nominative neglegens) "heedless, careless, unconcerned," present participle of neglegere "to neglect" (see neglect (v.)). Of action, conduct, etc., c. 1500. Related: Negligently.

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negligence (n.)

"heedless disregard of duty, inactivity, indifference, habit of omitting to do things which ought to be done," mid-14c., necligence, from Old French negligence "negligence, sloth; injury, injustice" (12c.), and directly from Latin neclegentia, neglegentia "carelessness, heedlessness, neglect," from neglegentem (nominative neglegens) "heedless, careless, unconcerned," present participle of neglegere "to neglect" (see neglect (v.)).

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negligee (n.)

1756, "a kind of loose gown worn by women," from French négligée, noun use of fem. past participle of négligier "to neglect" (14c.), from Latin neglegere "to disregard, not heed, not trouble oneself about," also "to make light of" (see neglect (v.)).

So called in comparison to the elaborate costume of a fully dressed woman of the period. Grose ["Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1788] reports it "vulgarly termed a neggledigee." The word was borrowed again c.1835; the modern sense "semi-transparent, flimsy, lacy dressing gown" is yet another revival, recorded from 1930. It also was used in the U.S. funeral industry mid-20c. for "shroud of a corpse."

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non-performance (n.)

also nonperformance, "failure or neglect to perform," c. 1500, from non- + performance.

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sluttery (n.)
"neglect of cleanliness and order," 1580s, from slut + -ery. From 1841 as "an untidy room."
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