Etymology
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nautical (adj.)

"pertaining to ships, sailors, or navigation," 1550s, from -al (1) + nautic from French nautique, from Latin nauticus "pertaining to ships or sailors," from Greek nautikos "seafaring, naval," from nautes "sailor," from naus "ship" (from PIE root *nau- "boat").

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aeronautics (n.)
1824, "art of aerial navigation by means of a balloon," from aeronautic (1784), from French aéronautique, from aéro- (see aero-) + nautique "of ships," from Latin nauticus, from Greek nautikos "pertaining to sailing" (see nautical). Originally of hot-air balloons. Also see -ics. Aeronaut "balloonist" is from 1784, from French aéronaute.
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abeam (adv.)
"at right angles to the keel" of a ship, hence in line with its beam, 1826, nautical, literally "on beam;" see a- (1) + beam (n.) in the nautical sense.
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chock-a-block (adj.)

"jammed together," 1840, nautical, said of two blocks of tackle run so closely they touch; from chock + block (n.1) in the nautical sense "a pulley together with its framework."

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aweigh (adv., adj.)
of an anchor, "raised, perpendicular," 1620s, nautical, from a- (1) + weigh.
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slew (v.)
"to turn, swing, twist," 1834, earlier slue (1769), a nautical word, of unknown origin. Slewed (1801) is old nautical slang for "drunk." Slew-foot "clumsy person who walks with feet turned out" is from 1896.
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overhaul (n.)

"an examination, inspection, repair," 1788, in nautical slang, from overhaul (v.).

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stay (v.2)

"support, sustain," early 15c., from French estayer (Modern French étayer), originally in nautical use, "secure by stays," from estaie (see stay (n.1)). The nautical sense in English is from 1620s. Related: Stayed; staying.

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alee (adv.)

late 14c., from a- (1) + lee (n.). Nautical, opposed to aweather.

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frap (v.)
"to strike, smite," early 14c., from Old French fraper "to strike, hit, beat," in nautical use "fix, fasten" (12c., Modern French frapper), cognate with Italian frappare "to strike," which is of unknown origin, perhaps imitative (compare rap (n.)). Nautical sense of "bind tightly" is from 1540s. Related: Frapped; frapping.
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