Etymology
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physico- 

word-forming element meaning "physical, physically; natural," from Latinized form of Greek physikos "natural, physical, pertaining to nature" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow"). Compare physic.

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physio- 

word-forming element meaning "nature, natural, physical," from Greek physios "nature" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow").

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-ation 
ending of some nouns of action; see -ate + -ion.
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-ose (2)
standard ending in chemical names of sugars, originally simply a noun-forming suffix, taken up by French chemists mid-19c.; it has no etymological connection with sugar. It appears around the same time in two chemical names, cellulose, which would owe it to the French suffix, and glucose, where it would be a natural result from the Greek original. Flood favors origin from glucose.
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-ization 
word-forming element making nouns of action, process, or state; see -ize + -ation.
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-ing (1)
suffix attached to verbs to mean their action, result, product, material, etc., from Old English -ing, also -ung, from Proto-Germanic *-unga-, *-inga- (cognates: Old Norse -ing, Dutch -ing, German -ung). In early use often denoting completed or habitual action; its use has been greatly expanded in Middle and Modern English.
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-ure 
suffix forming abstract nouns of action, from Old French -ure, from Latin -ura, an ending of fem. nouns denoting employment or result.
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-acious 
compound adjectival word-forming element of Latin origin, attached to verb stems and expressing intensity of action: "given to, inclined to, abounding in," or expressing intensity of physical or mental action, from Latin -aci- (nominative -ax, accusative -acem), noun ending used with verbal stems (see -acea), + -ous. The accompanying nouns are formed in -acity.
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-faction 
word-forming element making nouns of action from verbs, from Latin -factionem (nominative -factio), from facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").
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-sis 
suffix in Greek-derived nouns denoting action, process, state, condition, from Greek -sis, which is identical in meaning with Latin -entia, English -ing (1).
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