Etymology
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my (pron.)

"belonging to me," c. 1200, mi, reduced form of mine used before words beginning in consonants except h- (my father, but mine enemy), and from 14c. before all nouns. Always used attributively, mine being used for the predicate. As interjection, by 1825, probably a shortened form of my God!

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myself (pron.)

emphatic or reflexive form of I or me, c. 1500, mi-self, alteration of meself (c. 1200), from Old English phrase (ic) me self, where me is "a kind of ethical dative" [OED]. See my + self. The alteration from meself is by analogy of herself, where her- was felt as genitive (though analogous hisself remains bad form).

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hop-o-my-thumb (n.)
"very small person," 1520s, Hoppe upon my thombe.
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mine (pron.)

Old English min "mine, my," (pronoun and adjective), from Proto-Germanic *minaz (source also of Old Frisian, Old Saxon Old High German min, Middle Dutch, Dutch mijn, German mein, Old Norse minn, Gothic meins "my, mine"), from the base of me.

As an adjective, "belonging to me," preceding its noun (which may be omitted), it was superseded from 13c. by my when the noun is expressed. As a noun, "my people, my family," from Old English. In this heart of mine, no fault of mine, etc., the form is a double genitive.

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myo- 
before vowels my-, word-forming element meaning "muscle," from combining form of Greek mys "muscle," literally "mouse" (see muscle (n.)).
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Hephzibah 
fem. proper name, biblical, from Hebrew Hephtzibah, literally "my delight is in her," from hephtzi "my delight" (from haphetz "to delight, to desire") + bah "in her."
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LMAO 
by 1997, online abbreviation of laughing my ass off. Related: LMFAO (by 2000).
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Elihu 
masc. proper name, Hebrew, literally "he is my God."
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monseigneur (n.)

French title of honor given to princes, bishops, and other dignitaries of the church or court, equivalent to my lord, c. 1600, from French monseigneur (12c.), from mon "my" (from Latin meum) + seigneur "lord," from Latin seniorem, accusative of senior "older" (from PIE root *sen- "old"). Plural messeigneurs.

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vice-president (n.)

also vice president, 1570s, "one who acts as a deputy for a president," from vice- + president. Made into an official rank and given a different meaning (vice = "next in rank to") in the U.S. Constitution (1787).

There seems to be no doubt of my election as V[ice] Pres[iden]t. It will have at least one advantage, that of permitting me to devote more of my time to my private affairs. [John C. Calhoun, letter to wife, Nov. 12, 1824]

Related: vice presidential; vice presidency.

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