Etymology
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murmur (n.)

late 14c., "expression of (popular) discontent or complaint by grumbling," from Old French murmure "murmur, sound of human voices; trouble, argument" (12c.), noun of action from murmurer "to murmur," from Latin murmurare "to murmur, mutter," from murmur (n.) "a hum, muttering, rushing," probably from a PIE reduplicative base *mor-mor, of imitative origin (source also of Sanskrit murmurah "crackling fire," Greek mormyrein "to roar, boil," Lithuanian murmlenti "to murmur").

Meaning "a low sound continuously repeated" (of bees, streams, etc.) is by c. 1400. That of "softly spoken words" is from 1670s. Medical sense of "sound heard in auscultation" is by 1824.

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murmur (v.)

late 14c., "make a low continuous noise; grumble, complain," from Old French murmurer "murmur, grouse, grumble" (12c.), from murmur "rumbling noise" (see murmur (n.)). Transitive sense of "say indistinctly" is from 1530s. Related: Murmured; murmuring.

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murmuring (n.)

"a continuous. low, indistinct noise," late 14c., verbal noun from murmur (v.).

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mutter (n.)

"a murmur or murmuring," 1630s, from mutter (v.).

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susurration (n.)

"a whispering, a murmur," c. 1400, from Latin susurrationem (nominative susurratio), from past participle stem of susurrare "to hum, murmur," from susurrus "a murmur, whisper," a reduplication of the PIE imitative *swer- "to buzz, whisper" (source also of Sanskrit svarati "sounds, resounds," Greek syrinx "flute," Latin surdus "dull, mute," Old Church Slavonic svirati "to whistle," Lithuanian surma "pipe, shawm," German schwirren "to buzz," Old English swearm "a swarm").

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susurrant (adj.)
1791, from Latin susurrantem (nominative susurrans), present participle of susurrare "to hum, murmur" (see susurration). Susurrous (adj.) is from 1824.
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grutch (v.)
c. 1200, grucchen, "to murmur, complain, find fault with, be angry," from Old French grouchier, grocier "to murmur, to grumble," of unknown origin, perhaps from Germanic, probably ultimately imitative. Meaning "to begrudge" is c. 1400. Compare gruccild (early 13c.) "woman who complains," from grutch + suffix of unknown origin. Related: Grutched; grutching. As a noun from c. 1400.
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grudge (v.)
mid-15c., "to murmur, complain," variant of grutch. Meaning "to begrudge, envy, wish to deprive of" is c. 1500. Related: Grudged; grudges; grudging; grudgingly.
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mutter (v.)

early 14c., moteren "to mumble, utter words in a low tone with compressed lips," from a common PIE imitative *mut- "to grunt, mutter" (source also of Old Norse muðla "to murmur," Latin muttire "to mutter," Old High German mutilon "to murmur, mutter; to drizzle"), with frequentative suffix -er. Related: Muttered; muttering.

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gruntle (v.)

1938, in gruntled "pleased, satisfied," a back-formation from disgruntled. The original verb (early 15c.) meant "to utter a little or low grunt," hence "to murmur, complain" (1560s), but was rare or dialectal by 18c.

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