Etymology
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mummer (n.)

"one who performs in a mumming, actor in a dumb show," early 15c., probably a fusion of Old French momeur "mummer" (from Old French momer "mask oneself," from momon "mask") and Middle English mommen "to mutter, be silent," which is the source of mum (interjection). "[S]pecifically, in England, one of a company of persons who go from house to house at Christmas performing a kind of play, the subject being generally St. George and the Dragon, with sundry whimsical adjuncts" [Century Dictionary].

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Mummerset (n.)

"imaginary west-of-England country dialect used on stage," by 1925, from mummer + Somerset.

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mummery (n.)

1520s, "a show or performance of mumming," from Old French mommerie, from momer "to mask oneself" (see mummer). Transferred sense of "ridiculous ceremony or ritual" is from 1540s.

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guiser (n.)
"masquerader, mummer, one who goes from house to house, whimsically disguised, and making diversion with songs and antics, usually at Christmas," late 15c., agent noun from guise.
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geezer (n.)

derisive word for an old man, 1885, according to OED a variant of obsolete Cockney guiser "mummer, one wearing a mask or costume as part of a performance" (late 15c.; see guise). If so, the original notion was "one who went about in disguise," hence "odd man," hence "old man" (it still commonly is qualified by old).

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