Etymology
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Ms. 

(plural Mses.), in modern continuous use from about 1949, considered a blend of Miss and Mrs. The abbreviation had appeared or been suggested before in this sense, since at least c. 1900.

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MS. 
abbreviation of Latin manu scriptum (see manuscript); the plural is MSS, after the custom in Modern Latin.
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miz 

1907 as graphing of U.S. Southern pronunciation of Mrs. or Miss (n.2); by 1972 as the standard pronunciation of Ms.

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pro-life (adj.)

"opposed to abortion," first attested 1976, from pro- + life. Used earlier in a more general sense of "enhancing life." Hostile alternative anti-choice attested 1978 in Ms. magazine (compare pro-choice).

What hypocrisy to call such anti-humanitarian people 'pro-life.' Call them what they are — antichoice. [Ms. magazine, Oct. 8, 1978]
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alright 

frequent spelling of all right, attested in print by 1884.

There are no such forms as all-right, or allright, or alright, though even the last, if seldom allowed by the compositors to appear in print, is often seen ... in MS. [Fowler]
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seafarer (n.)

"one whose life is spent voyaging the ocean," 1510s, from sea + agent noun from fare (v.). The Anglo-Saxon poem known by this name at least since 1842 was untitled in original MS. Related: Seafaring (c. 1200 as an adjective).

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manuscript (n.)

"book, paper, or other document written by hand with ink, pencil, etc.," as distinguished from anything printed, especially one written before the use of printing, c. 1600, earlier as an adjective, "written with the hand, handwritten, not printed" (1590s ), from Medieval Latin manuscriptum "document written by hand," from Latin manu scriptus "written by hand," from manu, ablative of manus "hand" (from PIE root *man- (2) "hand") + scriptus (neuter scriptum), past participle of scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). The abbreviation is MS, plural MSS. Related: Manuscriptal.

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copy (n.)

mid-14c., "written account or record," from Old French copie (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin copia "reproduction, transcript," from Latin copia "an abundance, ample supply, profusion, plenty," from assimilated form of com "with" (see com-) + ops (genitive opis) "power, wealth, resources," from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance."

Sense extended 15c. to any specimen of writing, especially MS given to a printer to be reproduced in type (Caxton, late 15c.). Meaning "a duplication, imitation, or reproduction" written or otherwise is from late 14c. Meaning "one of a set of reproductions containing the same matter" is from 1530s.

Copy-boy, one who takes copy from the writer to the printer, is from 1888. The newspaper copy-desk, where copy is edited for printing, is from 1887; copy-editor is attested from 1889.

The "copy desk" is the managing editor's literary inspection field, his last check by which the work of all editorial departments is gauged, the final balance where the brain product of the entire working force of the paper is weighed and judged. [The Journalist, May 21, 1892]
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