Etymology
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motion (n.)

late 14c., mocioun, "process of moving; change of place, continuous variation of position;" also "suggestion, proposal or proposition formally made," from Old French mocion "movement, motion; change, alteration" (13c., Modern French motion) and directly from Latin motionem (nominative motio) "a moving, a motion; an emotion," from past-participle stem of movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

From c. 1400 in legal sense of "application to a court or judge." To be in motion "in a state of motion" is from c. 1600; to set in motion "set working" is from 1590s. To go through the motions in the figurative sense of "pretend, do in a perfunctory manner" is by 1816 from the notion of "simulate the motions of." Motion picture is attested from 1896; motion sickness by 1942.

Rev. G.S. White said : The Presbytery does not favour the proposition of the Richmond Convention, and thinks the appointment of the Committee unnecessary; yet I suppose, that like the man who had nothing to eat, yet always spread the table, and sat down, and went through the motions—so we, according to our brother, are in honour bound, to appoint the Committee and go through the motions!—[Laughter] [The Presbyterian Magazine, May, 1858]
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motion (v.)

late 15c., "to request, petition" (obsolete), from motion (n.). The sense in parliamentary procedure, "to propose, move" is by 1747; with meaning "to guide or direct by a significant sign, gesture, or movement," as with the hand or head, it is attested from 1787. Related: Motioned; motioning.

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motionless (adj.)

"without motion, being at rest," 1590s, from motion (n.) + -less. Related: Motionlessly; motionlessness.

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locomotion (n.)
1640s, "action or power of motion," from Latin loco "from a place" (ablative of locus "a place;" see locus) + motionem (nominative motio) "motion, a moving" (see motion (n.)). From 1788 as "movement from place to place."
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kinetics (n.)
"science of motion and forces acting on bodies in motion," 1864, from kinetic; see -ics.
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kinesiology (n.)

1894, from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + -ology. Related: Kinesiological; kinesiologically.

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kinematics (n.)

"the science of motion," 1840, from French cinématique (Ampère, 1834), from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move," from PIE *kie-neu-, suffixed form of root *keie- "set in motion." Related: Kinematic (adj.), 1846; kinematical; kinematically.

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kinesis (n.)

"physical movement, muscular action," 1819, from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move," from PIE *kie-neu-, suffixed form of root *keie- "set in motion."

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kinesics (n.)

study of body language, 1952, from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + -ics. Related: kinesic.

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car-sick (adj.)
also carsick, "dizzy and nauseated from the motion of an automobile," 1908, from car (n.) + sick (adj.). Earlier it was used in the sense of "sick from the motion of a railroad car." Related: Car-sickness.
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