Etymology
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monetary (adj.)

1802, "pertaining to coinage or currency;" 1860, "pertaining to money;" from Late Latin monetarius "pertaining to money," originally "of a mint," from Latin moneta "mint; coinage" (see money (n.)). Related: Monetarily.

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monetarist (adj.)

1914, "of a monetary character or having a monetary basis," from monetary + -ist. As a noun, "one who advocates tight control of the money supply to remedy inflation," by 1963. Related Monetarism (1963).

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lev (n.)
monetary unit of Bulgaria, introduced 1881, literally "lion" (compare leu).
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Euro (n.)
name for the basic monetary unit of a pan-European currency, from 1996.
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yen (n.1)
Japanese monetary unit, 1875, from Japanese yen, from Chinese yuan "round, round object, circle, dollar."
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leu (n.)
monetary unit of Romania, introduced 1867, literally "lion." Monetary names in the Balkans often translate as "lion" because Dutch gold coins stamped with lions circulated widely in the region in the 17c. and the word for "lion" came to be a word for "money" in some languages there.
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half-cent (n.)
U.S. copper coin minted from 1793 to 1857, established and named in the 1786 resolution for a new monetary system; see half + cent.
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demonetize (v.)

"divest of standard monetary value," 1852, from French démonitiser, from de- (see de-) + monetiser (see monetize). Also demonetise. Related: Demonetized; demonetizing.

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sucre (n.)
monetary unit of Ecuador, 1886, named for Antonio José de Sucre (1795-1830), Venezuelan general and liberator of Ecuador.
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lira (n.)
Italian monetary unit, 1610s, from Italian lira, literally "pound," from Latin libra "pound (unit of weight);" see Libra, and compare livre. There also was a Turkish lira.
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