Etymology
Advertisement
molten (adj.)

"melted, in a state of solution," c. 1300, from archaic strong past participle of Old English meltian, a class III strong verb (see melt (v.)).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
magma (n.)

mid-15c., "dregs, any crude mixture of organic matter," from Latin magma "dregs of an ointment," from Greek magma "thick unguent, ointment," from root of massein "to knead, mold," from PIE root *mag- "to knead, fashion, fit." Geological meaning "molten or semi-molten rock" is by 1859. Related: Magmatic.

Related entries & more 
tektite (n.)
small roundish glass bodies, probably of meteoric origin, 1909, from German tektit (Suess, 1900), from Greek tektos "molten," from tekein "to melt."
Related entries & more 
lava (n.)
"molten rock issuing from a volcano," 1750, from Italian (Neapolitan or Calabrian dialect) lava "torrent, stream," traditionally said to be from Latin lavare "to wash" (from PIE root *leue- "to wash"). Originally applied in Italian to flash flood rivulets after downpours, then to streams of molten rock from Vesuvius. Alternative etymology is from Latin labes "a fall," from labi "to fall, slip" (see lapse (n.)). As an adjective, lavatic (1805), laval (1883). Lava lamp is attested from 1965, also lava light (reg. U.S., 1968, as Lava Lite).
Related entries & more 
baste (v.2)
"to soak (cooking meat) in gravy or molten fat, moisten," late 14c., of unknown origin, possibly from Old French basser "to moisten, soak," from bassin "basin" (see basin). Related: Basted; basting.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
melt (n.)

1854, "molten metal, a substance in a melted condition," from melt (v.). In reference to a type of sandwich (typically tuna) topped by melted cheese, by 1956, American English.

Related entries & more 
lede (n.1)
by 1965, alternative spelling of lead (n.2) in the newspaper journalism sense, to distinguish this specialized sense from other possible meanings of the written word, perhaps especially the molten lead (n.1) used in 20c. typesetting machines.
Related entries & more 
puddle (v.)

mid-15c., "to dabble in water, poke in mud," from puddle (n.); the extended sense in iron manufacture is "turn and stir (molten iron) in a furnace (to expel oxygen and carbon)." Related: Puddled; puddling.

Related entries & more 
pig iron (n.)

"iron in pigs," as it comes from a blast furnace, iron that has been run while molten into a mold in sand, 1660s; see pig (n.2) + iron (n.).

Related entries & more 
gutter (v.)
late 14c., "to make or run in channels" (transitive), from gutter (n.). Intransitive use, in reference to candles (1706) it is from the channel that forms as the molten wax flows off. Related: Guttered; guttering.
Related entries & more