Etymology
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molasses (n.)

"uncrystallized syrup produced in the manufacture of sugar," 1580s, from Portuguese melaço, from Late Latin mellaceum "new wine," properly neuter of mellaceus "resembling honey," from Latin mel (genitive mellis) "honey" (from PIE root *melit- "honey"). Adopted in English in plural form and generally remaining so, but regarded as a singular noun.

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*melit- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "honey."

It forms all or part of: caramel; marmalade; Melissa; mellifluous; mildew; molasses; mousse.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek meli, Latin mel "honey; sweetness;" Albanian mjal' "honey;" Old Irish mil "honey," Irish milis "sweet;" Old English mildeaw "nectar," milisc "honeyed, sweet;" Old High German milsken "to sweeten;" Gothic miliþ "honey."

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taffy (n.)
coarse candy made from sugar or molasses boiled down and cooled, 1817, related to toffee, but of uncertain origin; perhaps associated with tafia (1763), a rum-like alcoholic liquor distilled from molasses, presumably of West Indian or Malay (Austronesian) origin (perhaps a Creole shortening of ratafia). On this theory, the candy would have been made from the syrup skimmed off the liquor during distillation.
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purgery (n.)

"bleaching room for sugar," where it is put to drain off its molasses and imperfections, 1847, from French purgerie (1838), from purger "to wash, clean; refine, purify" (see purge (v.)). For the legal word, see perjury.

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treacle (n.)
mid-14c., "medicinal compound, antidote for poison," from Old French triacle "antidote, cure for snake-bite" (c. 1200), from Vulgar Latin *triacula, from Latin theriaca, from Greek theriake (antidotos) "antidote for poisonous wild animals," from fem. of theriakos "of a wild animal," from therion "wild animal," diminutive of ther (genitive theros) "wild animal," from PIE root *ghwer- "wild beast."

Sense of "molasses" is first recorded 1690s (the connection may be from the use of molasses as a laxative, or its use to disguise the bad taste of medicine); that of "anything too sweet or sentimental" is from 1771. Related: Treacly.
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elution (n.)

"washing, purification," 1610s, from Late Latin elutionem (nominative elutio) "a washing out," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin eluere "to wash out, wash off, clean," from ex "out" (see ex-) + luere "to wash" (from PIE root *leue- "to wash"). Especially in reference to a process of obtaining sugar from molasses.

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pandowdy (n.)

also pandoulde, etc., "pudding of bread and apples baked together," usually cooked with molasses," 1846, American English colloquial, of uncertain origin. It appears as the name of a character in a temperance story from 1839, and pandoodle is the name of some sort of dish available on a sailing ship in 1775.

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swizzle (n.)
1813, name for various kinds of liquor drinks, or for intoxicating drinks generally, possibly a variant of switchel "a drink of molasses and water" (often mixed with rum), first attested 1790, of uncertain origin. As a verb from 1843. Related: Swizzled; swizzling. Swizzle-stick, used for stirring drinks, attested by 1859.
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arrack (n.)
c. 1600, probably picked up in India (as were Portuguese araca, Spanish arac, French arack), via Hindi arak, Tamil araku, etc., ultimately from Arabic araq "distilled spirits, strong liquor," literally "sweat, juice;" used of native liquors in Eastern countries, especially those distilled from fermented sap of coconut palm, sometimes from rice or molasses.
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enchilada (n.)

Mexican dish made with a fried tortilla rolled around a filling and served with chili sauce, 1876, American English, from Mexican Spanish enchilada, fem. past participle of enchilar "season with chili," from en- "in" + chile "chili" (see chili).

You never ate enchilada, did you? I hope you never will. An enchilada looks not unlike an ordinary flannel cake rolled on itself and covered with molasses. The ingredients which go to make it up are pepper, lye, hominy, pepper, onions chopped fine, pepper, grated cheese, and pepper. [The Health Reformer, December 1876]
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