Etymology
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modernism (n.)

1737, "deviation from the ancient and classical manner" [Johnson, who calls it "a word invented by Swift"], from modern (adj.) + -ism. From 1830 as "modern ways and styles." As a movement in the arts (away from classical or traditional modes), from 1924.

I wish you would give orders against the corruption of English by those scribblers who send us over [to Ireland] their trash in prose and verse, with abominable curtailings and quaint modernisms. [Swift to Pope, July 23, 1737]
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modernist (n.)

1580s, "a modern person," from modern (adj.) + -ist. Later, "one who admires or prefers the modern" (as opposed to the classical), 1704. As a follower of a movement in the arts (see modernism), attested from 1925.

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postmodernism (n.)
also post-modernism, by 1977, from post- + modernism. Defined by Terry Eagleton as "the contemporary movement of thought which rejects ... the possibility of objective knowledge" and is therefore "skeptical of truth, unity, and progress" ["After Theory," 2003]. Related: post-modernist (1965).
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modernistic (adj.)

"of, pertaining to, or suggestive of modernism or what is modern," 1878, from modernist + -ic.

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