Etymology
Advertisement
mnemonic (adj.)

1753, "aiding the memory, intended to assist the memory;" 1825, "pertaining to the memory," a back-formation from mnemonics, or from a Latinized form of Greek mnēmonikos "of or pertaining to memory," from mnēmōn (genitive mnēmonos) "remembering, mindful," from mnēmē "memory, a remembrance, record, an epitaph; memory as a mental faculty," from base of mnasthai "remember," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think." The noun meaning "mnemonic device" is from 1858. Related: Mnemonical (1660s).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
amnemonic (adj.)
"characterized by loss of memory," 1868; see a- (3) + mnemonic.
Related entries & more 
mnemonics (n.)

"art of developing or improving memory," 1721; see mnemonic; also see -ics. Related: Mnemonician; mnemonist.

Related entries & more 
antimnemonic (adj.)
"injurious to the memory," 1817, from anti- "against, opposite" + mnemonic "aiding the memory."
Related entries & more 
mnestic (adj.)

"pertaining to memory," 1914, from Greek mnestis "remembrance," related to mnesis "memory" (see mnemonic) + -ic.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
mnesic (adj.)

"pertaining to memory," 1898, from Greek mnesikos "of memory," from mnesis "memory" (see mnemonic).

Related entries & more 
*men- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to think," with derivatives referring to qualities and states of mind or thought.

It forms all or part of: admonish; Ahura Mazda; ament; amentia; amnesia; amnesty; anamnesis; anamnestic; automatic; automaton; balletomane; comment; compos mentis; dement; demonstrate; Eumenides; idiomatic; maenad; -mancy; mandarin; mania; maniac; manic; mantic; mantis; mantra; memento; mens rea; mental; mention; mentor; mind; Minerva; minnesinger; mnemonic; Mnemosyne; money; monition; monitor; monster; monument; mosaic; Muse; museum; music; muster; premonition; reminiscence; reminiscent; summon.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit manas- "mind, spirit," matih "thought," munih "sage, seer;" Avestan manah- "mind, spirit;" Greek memona "I yearn," mania "madness," mantis "one who divines, prophet, seer;" Latin mens "mind, understanding, reason," memini "I remember," mentio "remembrance;" Lithuanian mintis "thought, idea," Old Church Slavonic mineti "to believe, think," Russian pamjat "memory;" Gothic gamunds, Old English gemynd "memory, remembrance; conscious mind, intellect."

Related entries & more 
floccinaucinihilipilification (n.)

"action or habit of estimating as worthless," in popular smarty-pants use from c. 1963; attested 1741 (in a letter by William Shenstone, published 1769), a combination of four Latin words (flocci, nauci, nihili, pili) all signifying "at a small price" or "for nothing," which appeared together in a rule of the well-known Eton Latin Grammar + Latin-derived suffix -fication "making, causing."

[F]or whatever the world might esteem in poor Somervile, I really find, upon critical enquiry, that I loved him for nothing so much as his flocci-nauci-nihili-pili-fication of money. [Shenstone, letter, 1741]

The kind of jocular formation that was possible among educated men in Britain in those days. Just so, as in praesenti, the opening words of the mnemonic lines on conjugation in Lilley's 16c. Latin grammar, could stand alone as late as 19c. and be understood to mean "rudiments of Latin."

Related entries & more