Etymology
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mix (v.)

1530s, transitive, "unite or blend promiscuously into one mass, body, or assemblage," a back-formation from Middle English myxte (early 15c.) "mingled, blended, composed of more than one element, of mixed nature," from Anglo-French mixte (late 13c.), from Latin mixtus, past participle of miscere "to mix, mingle, blend; fraternize with; throw into confusion," from PIE root *meik- "to mix."

A rare verb before Elizabethan times. Perhaps it was avoided out of potential confusion with a group of common Middle English words such as mixen "dung-hill, pile of refuse," mix "filth, dung, dirt" mixed "foul, filthy," from PIE root *meigh- "to urinate" (source of Latin mingere, etc.).

Meaning "to form by mingling or blending different ingredients" is from 1570s. Intransitive sense of "become united or blended promiscuously" is from 1630s; that of "become joined or associated" is from 1660s. In cinematography and broadcasting, "combine two pictures or sounds by fading out and in," 1922. Old English as miscian (apparently borrowed from the Latin verb) did not survive into Middle English. Related: Mixed; mixing.

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mix (n.)

1580s, "act or result of mixing," from mix (v.). By 1882 as "a mixture, a jumble;" 1938 as "ingredients mixed together and sold ready for cooking."

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mix-up (n.)

"state of confusion," 1841, from the colloquial verbal phrase mix up "to confuse, entangle mentally" (1806), from mix (v.) + up (adv.). Of fighters, to mix it up "exchange blows" is by 1898.

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mixologist (n.)

"bartender," 1856, a U.S. jocular slang formation from mix (v.) + ending from the sciences (see -ologist). The full term in the earliest reference is mixologist of tipicular fixins.

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intermix (v.)
1550s (implied in intermixed), from inter- "between" + mix (v.). Originally transitive; intransitive sense is from 1722. Related: Intermixt; intermixing.
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mixer (n.)

1610s, "worker who mixes," agent noun from mix (v.). As a type of machine that mixes, from 1876. Sense of "person" as regards sociability (with a qualifying adjective) is by 1896; the meaning "troublemaker" is attested by 1938; the sense of "social gathering to mingle and get acquainted" dates from 1916.

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*meik- 

also *meig-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to mix." 

It forms all or part of: admix; admixture; immiscible; mash; meddle; medley; melange; melee; mestizo; metis; miscegenation; miscellaneous; miscible; mix; mixo-; mixture; mustang; pell-mell; promiscuous.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit misrah "mixed;" Greek misgein, mignynai "to mix, mix up, mingle; to join, bring together; join (battle); make acquainted with;" Old Church Slavonic mešo, mesiti "to mix," Russian meshat, Lithuanian maišau, maišyti "to mix, mingle," Welsh mysgu "to mix." 

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mixed (adj.)

mid-15c., also mixte, "consisting of different elements or parts," from Latin mixtus, past participle of miscēre "to mix, mingle, blend" (from PIE root *meik- "to mix," also see mix (v.)). From 1550s as "not comprised in one class or kind, indiscriminate." Of government from 1530s.

Mixed blessing, one with some unpleasant elements, is by 1849. Mixed marriage is from 1690s, originally in a religious context; racial sense was in use by 1942 in U.S., though mixed breed in reference to mulattoes is found by 1775. Mixed motives is by 1736; mixed feelings by 1782. Mixed bag "heterogeneous collection" is by 1895, from the hunting term for an assortment of game birds killed in one outing. Mixed up is from 1884 as "confused," from 1862 as "involved, implicated" (see mix-up). Mixed metaphor, "an expression in which two or more metaphors are confused," is by 1753.

Mixed drink in the modern liquor sense is recorded by 1868; the thing itself is older; Bartlett (1859) lists sixty names "given to the various compounds or mixtures of spirituous liquors and wines served up in fashionable bar rooms in the United States," all from a single advertisement. The list includes Tippe na Pecco, Moral suasion, Vox populi, Jewett's fancy, Ne plus ultra, Shambro, Virginia fancy, Stone wall, Smasher, Slingflip, Pig and whistle, Cocktail, Phlegm-cutter, Switchel flip, Tip and Ty, Ching-ching, Fiscal agent, Slip ticket, Epicure's punch.

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mixo- 

word-forming element of Greek origin meaning "mixed," from Greek mixo-, from mixis "a mixing, mingling, intercourse," from root of mignynai "to mix, mix up, mingle" (from PIE root *meik- "to mix"). As in mixolydian in reference to a half-Lydian mode in ancient Greek music.

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mixture (n.)

early 15c., "that which results from mixing;" mid-15c. "act of mixing, state of being mixed;" from Old French misture and directly from Latin mixtura "a mixing," from mixtus (from PIE root *meik- "to mix"). Earlier in both senses was mixtion (late 14c.), from Medieval Latin mixtionem.

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